font settings

Font Size: Large | Normal | Small
Font Face: Verdana | Geneva | Georgia

Choanozoa

(Phylum)

Overview

[ Back to top ]

A Phylum in the Kingdom Protozoa.

Taxonomy

[ Back to top ]

The Phylum Choanozoa is a member of the Kingdom Protozoa. Here is the complete "parentage" of Choanozoa:

The Phylum Choanozoa is further organized into finer groupings including:

Families

[ Back to top ]

Acanthoecidae

[more]

Amoebidiaceae

Amoebidiidae is a family or protists, previously thought to be zygomycete fungi belonging to the class , but now considered to be members of the opisthokont protist group Mesomycetozoea. The family was originally called Amoebidiaceae, and considered the sole family of the fungal order Amoebidiales. [more]

Amoebidiidae

Amoebidiidae is a family or protists, previously thought to be zygomycete fungi belonging to the class , but now considered to be members of the opisthokont protist group Mesomycetozoea. The family was originally called Amoebidiaceae, and considered the sole family of the fungal order Amoebidiales. [more]

Choanoflagellatea

The choanoflagellates are a group of free-living unicellular and colonial flagellate eukaryotes considered to be the closest living relatives of the animals. As the name suggests, choanoflagellates (collared flagellates) have a distinctive cell morphology characterized by an ovoid or spherical cell body 3-10 ?m in diameter with a single apical flagellum surrounded by a collar of 30-40 microvilli (see figure). Movement of the flagellum creates water currents that can propel free-swimming choanoflagellates through the water column and trap bacteria and detritus against the collar of microvilli where these foodstuffs are engulfed. This feeding provides a critical link within the global carbon cycle, linking trophic levels. In addition to their critical ecological roles, choanoflagellates are of particular interest to evolutionary biologists studying the origins of multicellularity in animals. As the closest living relatives of animals, choanoflagellates serve as a useful model for reconstructions of the last unicellular ancestor of animals. [more]

Codonosigidae

[more]

Cristidiscoidea

Nucleariidae

[more]

Salpingoecidae

[more]

At least 35 species and subspecies belong to the Family Salpingoecidae.

More info about the Family Salpingoecidae may be found here.

Sources

[ Back to top ]
Last Revised: August 25, 2014
2014/08/25 12:38:00