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Asparagales

(Order)

Overview

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Photos

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Taxonomy

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The Order Asparagales is a member of the Class Magnoliopsida. Here is the complete "parentage" of Asparagales:

The Order Asparagales is further organized into finer groupings including:

Families

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Alliaceae

Allioideae is the botanical name of a monocot subfamily of flowering plants in the family Amaryllidaceae, order Asparagales. It was formerly treated as a separate family, Alliaceae. The subfamily name is derived from the generic name of the type genus, Allium. [more]

Aloaceae

Asphodeloideae is a subfamily of the monocot family Xanthorrhoeaceae in the order Asparagales. It has previously been treated as a separate family, Asphodelaceae. The subfamily name is derived from the generic name of the type genus, Asphodelus. Members of group are native to Africa, central and western Europe, the Mediterranean basin, Central Asia and Australia, with one genus (Bulbinella) having some of its species in New Zealand. The greatest diversity occurs in South Africa. [more]

Amaryllidaceae

Amaryllidaceae are a family of herbaceous, perennial and bulbous flowering plants included in the monocot order Asparagales. The family takes its name from the genus Amaryllis, hence the common name of the Amaryllis family. [more]

Anthericaceae

Agavoideae is a subfamily of monocot flowering plants in the family Asparagaceae, order Asparagales. It has previously been treated as a separate family, Agavaceae. The group includes many well-known desert and dry zone types such as the agave, yucca, and Joshua tree. There are about 640 species in around 23 genera, widespread in the tropical, subtropical and warm temperate regions of the world. [more]

Aphyllanthaceae

Aphyllanthoideae is a monocot subfamily of flowering plants in the family Asparagaceae, order Asparagales. It was formerly treated as a separate family, Aphyllanthaceae. The subfamily (and family) names are derived from the generic name of the type genus, Aphyllanthes, endemic to the western Mediterranean region. [more]

Asparagaceae

Asparagaceae is the botanical name of a family of flowering plants, placed in the order Asparagales of the monocots. [more]

Asphodelaceae

Asphodeloideae is a subfamily of the monocot family Xanthorrhoeaceae in the order Asparagales. It has previously been treated as a separate family, Asphodelaceae. The subfamily name is derived from the generic name of the type genus, Asphodelus. Members of group are native to Africa, central and western Europe, the Mediterranean basin, Central Asia and Australia, with one genus (Bulbinella) having some of its species in New Zealand. The greatest diversity occurs in South Africa. [more]

Asteliaceae

Asteliaceae is the botanical name of a family of flowering plants, placed in the order Asparagales of the monocots. [more]

Blandfordiaceae

Blandfordia is a genus of flowering plants, placed in the family Blandfordiaceae of the order Asparagales of the monocots. The genus is native to eastern Australia. Plants in this genus are commonly referred to as Christmas Bells due to the shape of their flowers and the timing of their flowering season in Australia. Blandfordia was named by English botanist James Edward Smith in 1804 in honour of George Spencer-Churchill, 5th Duke of Marlborough, the Marquis of Blandford. [more]

Convallariaceae

Nolinoideae is a monocot subfamily of the family Asparagaceae in the APG III system of 2009. It was previously treated as a separate family, Ruscaceae s.l. The family name is derived from the generic name of the type genus, Nolina. [more]

Dianellaceae

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Doryanthaceae

Doryanthaceae is the botanical name of a family of flowering plants, placed in the order Asparagales of the monocots. The family has only recently been recognized by taxonomists. The APG III system of 2009 (unchanged from the 1998 and 2003 versions) does recognize this family. The family then includes only a single genus (Doryanthes) of few species of large plants in Eastern Australia. [more]

Dracaenaceae

Nolinoideae is a monocot subfamily of the family Asparagaceae in the APG III system of 2009. It was previously treated as a separate family, Ruscaceae s.l. The family name is derived from the generic name of the type genus, Nolina. [more]

Hemerocallidaceae

Hemerocallidoideae is the botanical name of a subfamily of flowering plants, part of the family Xanthorrhoeaceae sensu lato in the monocot order Asparagales according to the APG system of 2009. Earlier classification systems treated the group as a separate family, the Hemerocallidaceae. The name is derived from the generic name of the type genus, Hemerocallis. The largest genera in the group are Dianella (with 20 species), Hemerocallis (15), and Caesia (11). [more]

Herreriaceae

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Hypoxidaceae

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Iridaceae

The Iris family or Iridaceae is a family of perennial, herbaceous and bulbous plants included in the monocot order Asparagales, taking its name from the genus Iris. Almost worldwide in distribution and one of the most important families in horticulture, it includes more than 2000 species. Genera such as Crocus and Iris are significant components of the floras of parts of Eurasia, and Iris also is well-represented in North America. Gladiolus and Moraea are large genera and major constituents of the flora of sub-Saharan and Southern Africa. Sisyrinchium, with more than 140 species, is the most diversified Iridaceae genus in the Americas, where several other genera occur, many of them important in tropical horticulture. [more]

Lanariaceae

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Nolinaceae

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Ophiopogonaceae

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Orchidaceae

The Orchidaceae, commonly referred to as the orchid family, is a morphologically diverse and widespread family of monocots in the order Asparagales. Along with the Asteraceae, it is one of the two largest families of flowering plants, with between 21,950 and 26,049 currently accepted species, found in 880 genera. Selecting which of the two families is larger remains elusive because of the difficulties associated with putting hard species numbers on such enormous groups. Regardless, the number of orchid species equals more than twice the number of bird species, and about four times the number of mammal species. It also encompasses about 6?11% of all seed plants. The largest genera are Bulbophyllum (2,000 species), Epidendrum (1,500 species), Dendrobium (1,400 species) and Pleurothallis (1,000 species). [more]

Phormiaceae

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Ruscaceae

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Tecophilaeaceae

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Xanthorrhoeaceae

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At least 66 species and subspecies belong to the Family Xanthorrhoeaceae.

More info about the Family Xanthorrhoeaceae may be found here.

Sources

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Last Revised: August 25, 2014
2014/08/25 15:41:28