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Enterobacteriaceae

(Family)

Overview

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A Family in the Kingdom Bacteria.

Photos

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Taxonomy

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The Family Enterobacteriaceae is a member of the Order Enterobacteriales. Here is the complete "parentage" of Enterobacteriaceae:

The Family Enterobacteriaceae is further organized into finer groupings including:

Genera

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Alterococcus

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Arizona

Arizona (;/?r?'zo?n?/) (Navajo: Hoozdo Hahoodzo; O'odham: Ali ?onak) is a state of the United States, located in the southwestern region of the country. Arizona is also part of the Western United States and of the Mountain West states. Arizona is the sixth most extensive and the 16th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. The second largest city is Tucson, followed in population by eight cities of the Phoenix metropolitan area: Mesa, Glendale, Chandler, Scottsdale, Gilbert, Tempe, Peoria, and Surprise. [more]

Arsenophonus

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Brenneria

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Budvicia

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Buttiauxella

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Cedecea

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Citrobacter

Citrobacter is a genus of Gram-negative coliform bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family. [more]

Dickeya

Edwardsiella

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Enterobacter

Enterobacter is a genus of common , facultatively-anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Several strains of the these bacteria are pathogenic and cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised (usually hospitalized) hosts. The urinary and respiratory tract are the most common sites of infection. [more]

Erwinia

Erwinia is a genus of bacteria containing mostly plant pathogenic species which was named for the first phytobacteriologist, Erwin Smith. It is a gram negative bacterium related to E.coli, Shigella, Salmonella and Yersinia. It is primarily a rod-shaped bacteria. A well-known member of this genus is the species E. amylovora, which causes fireblight on apple, pear, and other Rosaceous crops. Erwinia carotovora (now known as Pectobacterium carotovorum)[citation needed] is another species, which causes diseases in many plants. These species produce enzymes that hydrolyze pectin between individual plant cells. This causes the cells to separate, a disease plant pathologists term plant rot. [more]

Escherichia

Escherichia is a genus of Gram-negative, non-spore forming, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae. In those species which are inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tracts of warm-blooded animals, Escherichia species provide a portion of the microbially-derived vitamin K for their host. A number of the species of Escherichia are pathogenic. The genus is named after Theodor Escherich, discoverer of E. coli [more]

Ewingella

Hafnia

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Klebsiella

Klebsiella is a genus of non-motile, Gram-negative, oxidase-negative, rod-shaped bacteria with a prominent polysaccharide-based capsule. It is named after the German microbiologist Edwin Klebs (1834?1913). Frequent human pathogens, Klebsiella organisms can lead to a wide range of disease states, notably pneumonia, urinary tract infections, septicemia, and soft tissue infections. [more]

Kluyvera

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Koserella

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Leclercia

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Leminorella

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Moellerella

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Obesumbacterium

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Pantoea

Pantoea is a genus of bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It comprises seven species and two sub-species. [more]

Pectobacterium

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Phlomobacter

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Photorhabdus

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Plesiomonas

Plesiomonas shigelloides is a species of bacteria. It is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium which has been isolated from freshwater, freshwater fish, and shellfish and from many types of animals including cattle, goats, swine, cats, dogs, monkeys, vultures, snakes, and toads. [more]

Pragia

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Proteus

In Greek mythology, Proteus (???te??) is an early sea-god, one of several deities whom Homer calls the "Old Man of the Sea",. Some who ascribe to him a specific domain call him the god of "elusive sea change," which suggests the constantly changing nature of the sea or the liquid quality of water in general. He was known as either a son of Poseidon in the Olympian theogony (Odyssey iv. 432), Nereus and Doris, or Oceanus and a Naiad and made the herdsman of Poseidon's seals, the great bull seal at the center of the harem. He can foretell the future, but, in a mytheme familiar to several cultures, will change his shape to avoid having to; he will answer only to someone who is capable of capturing him. From this feature of Proteus comes the adjective protean, with the general meaning of "versatile", "mutable", "capable of assuming many forms". "Protean" has positive connotations of flexibility, versatility and adaptability. The earliest attested form of the name is the Mycenaean Greek ??? ??????? po-ro-te-u, written in Linear B syllabic script. [more]

Providencia

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Rahnella

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Raoultella

The genus Raoultella is composed of Gram-negative, oxidase-negative, aerobic, nonmotile, capsulated, facultatively anaerobic rods (formerly designated Klebsiella) in the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is named after the French bacteriologist Didier Raoult. [more]

Saccharobacter

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Salmonella

Salmonella () is a genus of rod-shaped, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, predominantly motile enterobacteria with diameters around 0.7 to 1.5 ?m, lengths from 2 to 5 ?m, and flagella which grade in all directions (i.e. peritrichous). They are chemoorganotrophs, obtaining their energy from oxidation and reduction reactions using organic sources, and are facultative anaerobes. Most species produce hydrogen sulfide, which can readily be detected by growing them on media containing ferrous sulfate, such as TSI. Most isolates exist in two phases: a motile phase I and a nonmotile phase II. Cultures that are nonmotile upon primary culture may be switched to the motile phase using a Cragie tube.[citation needed] [more]

Samsonia

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Serratia

Serratia is a of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The most common species in the genus, S. marcescens, is normally the only pathogen and usually causes nosocomial infections. However, rare strains of S. plymuthica, S. liquefaciens, S. rubidaea, and S. odoriferae have caused diseases through infection. Members of this genus produce characteristic red pigment, prodigiosin, and can be distinguished from other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae by its unique production of three enzymes: DNase, lipase, and gelatinase. [more]

Shigella

Shigella is a genus of Gram-negative, nonspore forming, non-motile, rod-shaped bacteria closely related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella. The causative agent of human shigellosis, Shigella causes disease in primates, but not in other mammals.[] It is only naturally found in humans and apes. During infection, it typically causes dysentery. The genus is named after Kiyoshi Shiga, who first discovered it in 1898. [more]

Sodalis

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Tatumella

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Thorsellia

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Trabulsiella

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Wigglesworthia

Wigglesworthia glossinidia is a Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae, related to E. coli, which lives in the gut of the tsetse fly. The bacterium was described by Serap Aksoy and bears the name of the British entomologist Sir Vincent Brian Wigglesworth, who died the year prior to its description. Wigglesworthia has symbiotically coevolved with the tsetse fly for millions of years, and is a textbook example of a bacterial endosymbiont. Because of this relationship, Wigglesworthia has lost a large part of its genome and has one of the smallest known genomes of any living organism. Together with Buchnera aphidicola, Wigglesworthia has been the subject of genetic research into the minimal genome necessary for any living organism. Wigglesworthia also synthesises key vitamins which the tsetse fly does not get from its diet of blood. Without the vitamins Wigglesworthia produces, the tsetse fly cannot reproduce. Since the tsetse fly spreads African sleeping sickness, Wigglesworthia may one day be used to control the spread of this disease. [more]

Xenorhabdus

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Yersinia

Yersinia is a genus of bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Yersinia are Gram-negative rod shaped bacteria, a few micrometers long and fractions of a micrometer in diameter, and are facultative anaerobes. Some members of Yersinia are pathogenic in humans; in particular, Y. pestis is the causative agent of the plague. Rodents are the natural reservoirs of Yersinia; less frequently other mammals serve as the host. Infection may occur either through blood (in the case of Y. pestis) or in an alimentary fashion, occasionally via consumption of food products (especially vegetables, milk-derived products and meat) contaminated with infected urine or feces. [more]

Yokenella

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More info about the Genus Yokenella may be found here.

Sources

Last Revised: August 26, 2014
2014/08/26 04:35:59