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Therapsida

(Order)

Overview

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An Order in the Kingdom Animalia.

Taxonomy

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The Order Therapsida is a member of the Mirorder Eparctocyona. Here is the complete "parentage" of Therapsida:

The Order Therapsida is further organized into finer groupings including:

Families

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Acaremyidae

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Amphilestidae

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Amynodontidae

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Anomalomyidae

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Anteosauridae

The Anteosauridae or Anteosaurinae are a family (e.g. Boonstra 1963, 1969, Carroll 1988) or subfamily (e.g. Hopson & Barghusen 1986, King 1988) of very large carnivorous Dinocephalia (Anteosaurs) that are known from the Middle Permian of Russia (Doliosauriscus, Titanophoneus) and South Africa (Anteosaurus). The Russian genera were previously included by Efremov in the Brithopodidae. [more]

Archaeonycterididae

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Austrotriconodontidae

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Bauriidae

Bauriidae is a family of therocephalian therapsids. Bauriids are among the most advanced eutherocephalians and possess several mammal-like features such as a secondary palate. Unlike other therocephalians, bauriids were herbivorous. Two subfamilies are classified within Bauriidae: Nothogomphodontinae and Bauriinae. [more]

Brithopididae

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Brithopodidae

Brithopus is an extinct genus of dinocephalian therapsid. It was first named in 1838 and was traditionally classified in the Anteosauria, a group of carnivorous dinocephalians. In fact, Brithopus served as the basis for the family Brithopodidae, which once included many anteosaurian species. Because it is based on fragmentary, non-diagnostic material, Brithopus is now regarded as a nomen dubium, and the sole member of Brithopodidae. Brithopus may even be more closely related to herbivorous tapinocephalids than to anteosaurians. [more]

Burnetidae

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Cambaytheriidae

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Cetotheriopsidae

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Chiniquodontidae

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Chulsanbaataridae

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Cistecephalidae

Cistecephalidae is an extinct family of dicynodont therapsids from the Late Permian of South Africa. It includes the genera Cistecephalus, Cistecephaloides, and Kawingasaurus. Cistecephalids are thought to have had a fossorial or burrowing lifestyle, with adaptations such as broad skulls, strong forelimbs, and squat bodies. A similar group of dicynodonts called the were also fossorial, although to a lesser extent than cistecephalids. [more]

Crapartinellidae

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Cynognathidae

Cynognathus crateronotus was a meter-long predator of the Early to Middle Triassic. It was among the more mammal-like of the Synapsids, a member of a grouping called Eucynodontia. The genus Cynognathus had an almost worldwide distribution. Fossils have so far been recovered from South Africa, South America, China and Antarctica. [more]

Desmatophocidae

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Deuterosauridae

Deuterosaurus is a genus of the Therapsids, one of the "mammal-like? reptiles dominating land during the late Palaeozoic. [more]

Diademodontidae

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Dicynodontidae

Dicynodon ("Two Dog-teeth") is a type of dicynodont therapsid that flourished during the Permian period between 251 and 299 million years ago. Like all dicynodonts, it was herbivorous. This animal was toothless, except for prominent tusks, hence the name. It probably cropped vegetation with a horny beak, much like a tortoise, while the tusks may have been used for digging up roots and tubers. [more]

Didymictidae

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Djadochtatheriidae

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Dormaaliidae

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Dromomerycidae

Palaeomerycidae is an extinct family of ruminants (thus being even-toed ungulates of order Artiodactyla), probably ancestral to deer and musk deer. They lived in North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia from the Eocene to Miocene epoch 55.8 to 5.3 Ma, existing for approximately 50.5 million years. [more]

Ectypodontidae

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Endothiodontidae

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Ericiolacertidae

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Estemmenosuchidae

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Esthonychidae

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Eurhinodelphinidae

Eurhinodelphinidae is an extinct family of toothed whales which lived from the Oligocene to the Pliocene. Members of the family possessed an elongated jaw similar in appearance to a swordfish. [more]

Galeopsidae

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Galesauridae

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Gondwanatheriidae

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Gorgonopsidae

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Gypsonictopidae

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Hispanomerycidae

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Hyrachyidae

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Ictidosuchidae

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Indricotheriidae

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Janjucetidae

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Jonkeriidae

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Kannemeyeriidae

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Kenyamidae

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Kermackiidae

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Leptictidae

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Lumkuiidae

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Lystrosauridae

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Megacricetodontidae

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Microcosmodontidae

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Moschorhinidae

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Neoplagiaulacidae

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Oligopithecidae

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Pachynolophidae

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Pappotheriidae

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Paramyidae

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Patriocetidae

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Patriomanidae

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Paulchoffatiidae

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Pediomyidae

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Peramuridae

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Percrocutidae

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Picopsidae

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Potamotelsidae

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Pristerognathidae

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Procynosuchidae

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Prodinoceratidae

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Prosqualodontidae

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Protohydrochoeridae

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Protosirenidae

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Pseudictopidae

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Pseudocricetodontidae

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Pseudosciuridae

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Repenomamidae

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Rooneyidae

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Saghatheriidae

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Scaloposauridae

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Sclerocalyptidae

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Shuotheriidae

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Simocetidae

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Sparnotheriodontidae

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Squalodelphinidae

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Stagodontidae

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Stegodontidae

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Tapinocephalidae

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Therioherpetontidae

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Theroteinidae

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Titanosuchidae

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Traversodontidae

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Triconodontidae

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Tritheledontidae

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Tritylodontidae

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Vastanidae

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Venjukoviidae

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Volaticotheriidae

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Waipatiidae

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Waitsiidae

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Zhelestidae

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Zignodelphinidae

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More info about the Family Zignodelphinidae may be found here.

Sources

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Last Revised: October 03, 2013
2013/10/03 17:03:03