font settings

Font Size: Large | Normal | Small
Font Face: Verdana | Geneva | Georgia

Gruiformes

(Order)

Overview

[ Back to top ]

A Order in the Kingdom Animalia.

Photos

[ Back to top ]

Taxonomy

[ Back to top ]

The Order Gruiformes is further organized into finer groupings including:

Families

[ Back to top ]

Aptornithidae

The adzebills, genus Aptornis, were two closely related bird species, the North Island Adzebill, Aptornis otidiformis, and the South Island Adzebill, Aptornis defossor, of the extinct family Aptornithidae. The family was endemic to New Zealand. [more]

Aramidae

[more]

Bathornithidae

[more]

Brontornithidae

[more]

Cariamidae

The seriemas are the sole extant members of the small and ancient family Cariamidae, which is also the sole surviving family of the Cariamae. Once believed to be related to cranes, they have been placed by one recent study near the falcons, parrots and passerines, as well as the extinct terror birds. There are two species: [more]

Dryornithidae

[more]

Eogruidae

[more]

Ergilornithidae

[more]

Eurypygidae

The Sunbittern, Eurypyga helias is a bittern-like bird of tropical regions of the Americas, and the sole member of the family Eurypygidae (sometimes spelled Eurypigidae) and genus Eurypyga. [more]

Geranoididae

[more]

Gruidae

Cranes are a family, Gruidae, of large, long-legged and long-necked birds in the order Gruiformes. There are fifteen species of crane in four genera. Unlike the similar-looking but unrelated herons, cranes fly with necks outstretched, not pulled back. Cranes live on all continents except Antarctica and South America. [more]

Gryzajidae

[more]

Laornithidae

[more]

Messelornithidae

[more]

Mestiornithidae

Otidae

Bustards, including floricans and korhaans, are large terrestrial birds mainly associated with dry open country and steppes in the Old World. They make up the family Otididae (formerly known as Otidae). [more]

Otididae

Bustards, including floricans and korhaans, are large terrestrial birds mainly associated with dry open country and steppes in the Old World. They make up the family Otididae (formerly known as Otidae). [more]

Phororhacidae

[more]

Phorusrhacidae

[more]

Psilopteridae

[more]

Psophiidae

The trumpeters are a family of birds restricted to the humid forests of the Amazon and Guiana Shield in South America. They are named for the trumpeting or cackling threat call of the males. The three species resemble chickens in size; they measure 45 to 52 centimetres (18 to 20 inches) long and weigh 1 to 1.5 kilograms (2.2 to 3.3 pounds). They are dumpy birds with long necks and legs and curved bills and a hunched posture. Their heads are small, but their eyes are relatively large, making them look "good-natured". The plumage is soft, resembling fur or velvet on the head and neck. It is mostly black, with purple, green, or bronze iridescence, particularly on the wing coverts and the lower neck. In the best-known taxa the secondary and tertial flight feathers are white, grey, or greenish to black, and hairlike, falling over the lower back, which is the same color. These colors give the three generally accepted species their names. [more]

Rhynchocetidae

[more]

Rhynochetidae

The Kagu or Cagou (Rhynochetos jubatus) is a crested, long-legged, and bluish-grey bird endemic to the dense mountain forests of New Caledonia. It is the only surviving member of the genus Rhynochetos and the family Rhynochetidae, although a second species has been described from the fossil record. Measuring 55 cm (22 in) in length, it has pale grey plumage and bright red legs. Its 'nasal corns' are a unique feature not shared with any other bird. Almost flightless, it a spends its time on or near the ground, where it hunts its invertebrate prey, and builds a nest of sticks on the forest floor. Both parents share incubation of single egg, as well as rearing the chick. It has proved vulnerable to introduced predators, and is threatened with extinction. [more]

Songzidae

[more]

More info about the Family Songzidae may be found here.

Bibliography

[ Back to top ]

Sources

[ Back to top ]
Last Revised: August 25, 2014
2014/08/25 15:06:10