font settings

Font Size: Large | Normal | Small
Font Face: Verdana | Geneva | Georgia

Artiodactyla

(Order)

Overview

[ Back to top ]

A Order in the Kingdom Animalia.

Photos

[ Back to top ]

Taxonomy

[ Back to top ]

The Order Artiodactyla is a member of the Series Amniota. Here is the complete "parentage" of Artiodactyla:

The Order Artiodactyla is further organized into finer groupings including:

Families

[ Back to top ]

Agriochoeridae

[more]

Amphimerycidae

[more]

Anoplotheriidae

[more]

Anthracotheriidae

[more]

Antilocapridae

Antilocapridae is a family of artiodactyls endemic to North America. Their closest extant relatives are the giraffids. Only one species, the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), is living today; all other members of the family are extinct. The living pronghorn is a small ruminant mammal resembling an antelope. It bears small, forked horns. [more]

Bachitheriidae

[more]

Bovidae

[more]

Cainotheriidae

[more]

Camelidae

Camelids are members of the biological family Camelidae, the only living family in the suborder Tylopoda. dromedaries, Bactrian camels, llamas, alpacas, vicu?as, and guanacos are in this group. [more]

Cebochoeridae

[more]

Cervidae

Deer (singular and plural) are the ruminant mammals forming the family Cervidae. Species in the Cervidae family include white-tailed deer, mule deer such as black-tailed deer, elk, moose, red deer, reindeer (caribou), fallow deer, roe deer and chital. Male deer of all species (except the Chinese water deer) and also female reindeer grow and shed new antlers each year. In this they differ from permanently horned animals such as antelope; these are in the same order as deer and may bear a superficial resemblance. The musk deer of Asia and water chevrotain (or mouse deer) of tropical African and Asian forests are not usually regarded as true deer and form their own families, Moschidae and Tragulidae, respectively. [more]

Choeropotamidae

[more]

Climacoceratidae

[more]

Dacrytheriidae

[more]

Dichobunidae

[more]

Entelodontidae

Entelodonts, sometimes nicknamed hell pigs or terminator pigs, is an extinct family of pig-like omnivores endemic to forests and plains of North America, Europe, and Asia from the middle Eocene to early Miocene epochs (37.2?16.3 mya), existing for approximately 20.9 million years. [more]

Gelocidae

[more]

Giraffidae

The giraffids are ruminant artiodactyl mammals that share a common ancestor with deer and bovids. The biological family Giraffidae, once a diverse group spread throughout Eurasia and Africa, contains only two living members, the giraffe and the okapi. Both are confined to sub-saharan Africa: the giraffe to the open savannas, and the okapi to the dense rainforest of the Congo. The two species look very different on first sight, but share a number of common features, including a long, dark-colored tongue, lobed canine teeth, and horns covered in skin, called "ossicones". [more]

Haplobunodontidae

[more]

Helohyidae

[more]

Hippopotamidae

A Family in the Kingdom Animalia.[1] [more]

Hoplitomerycidae

[more]

Hypertragulidae

Hypertragulidae is an extinct family of even-toed ungulates (order Artiodactyla), endemic to North America, Europe, and Asia during the Eocene through Miocene, living 46.2?13.6 Ma, existing for approximately 32.6 million years. [more]

Leptomerycidae

[more]

Lophiomerycidae

[more]

Merycoidodontidae

Oreodonts, sometimes called prehistoric "ruminating hogs," were a family of cud-chewing plant-eater with a short face and tusk-like canine teeth. As their name implies, some of the better known forms were generally hog-like, and the group was once thought to be a member of Suina, the pigs, peccaries and their ancestors, though recent work indicate they were more closely related to camels. The scientific name means Mountain teeth and refer to the appearance of the molars. Most oreodonts were sheep-sized, though some genera grew to the size of cattle. They were heavy bodied, with short four-toed hooves. Unlike any modern ruminant, they had long tails. [more]

Mixtotheriidae

[more]

Moschidae

Musk deer are artiodactyls of the genus Moschus, the only genus of family Moschidae. They are more primitive than the cervids, or true deer, in not having antlers or facial glands, in having only a single pair of teats, and in possessing a gall bladder, a caudal gland, a pair of tusk-like teeth and?of particular economic importance to humans?a musk gland. Moschids live mainly in forested and alpine scrub habitats in the mountains of southern Asia, notably Himalayas. Moschids are entirely Asian in their present distribution, being extinct in Europe where the earliest musk deer are known from Oligocene deposits. [more]

Oreodontidae

[more]

Oromerycidae

[more]

Palaeomerycidae

[more]

Protoceratidae

[more]

Raoellidae

[more]

Sanitheriidae

[more]

Suidae

Suidae is the biological family to which pigs belong. In addition to numerous fossil species, up to sixteen extant species are currently recognized, classified into between four and eight genera. The family includes the domestic pig, Sus scrofa domesticus or Sus domesticus, in addition to numerous species of wild pig, such as the babirusa Babyrousa babyrussa and the warthog Phacochoerus aethiopicus. All suids are native to the Old World, ranging from Asia and its islands, to Europe, and Africa. [more]

Tayassuidae

A peccary (plural peccaries; also javelina and skunk pig; Portuguese javali and Spanish jabal?, sajino or pecar?) is a medium-sized mammal of the family Tayassuidae, or New World pigs. Peccaries are members of the artiodactyl suborder Suina, as are the pig family (Suidae) and possibly the hippopotamus family (Hippopotamidae). They are found in the southwestern area of North America and throughout Central and South America. Peccaries usually measure between 90 and 130 centimetres (3.0 and 4.3 ft) in length, and a full-grown adult usually weighs between about 20 to 40 kilograms (44 to 88 lb). The word ?peccary? is derived from the Carib word pakira or paquira. [more]

Tragulidae

Chevrotains, also known as mouse deer, are small ungulates that make up the family Tragulidae, the only members of the infraorder Tragulina. There are 10 living (extant) species in three genera, but there are also several species only known from fossils. The extant species are found in forests in South and Southeast Asia, with a single species in the rainforests of Central and West Africa. They are solitary or live in pairs, and feed almost exclusively on plant material. Depending on exact species, the Asian species weigh between 0.7 and 8.0 kilograms (1.5 and 18 lb), and the smallest species are also the smallest ungulates in the world. The African chevrotain is considerably larger at 7?16 kilograms (15?35 lb). [more]

Xiphodontidae

[more]

At least 9 species and subspecies belong to the Family Xiphodontidae.

More info about the Family Xiphodontidae may be found here.

Footnotes

[ Back to top ]
  1. http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=106011

Sources

[ Back to top ]
Last Revised: August 25, 2014
2014/08/25 14:55:45