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Animalia

(Kingdom)

Overview

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The animal kingdom, comprising most multicellular eukaryote organisms.

Photos

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Taxonomy

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The Kingdom Animalia is a member of the Domain Eukaryota. Here is the complete "parentage" of Animalia:

The Kingdom Animalia is further organized into finer groupings including:

Families

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Abacionidae

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Abadiellidae

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Abderitidae

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Abelisauridae

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Aberrantidae

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Abertellidae

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Abrocomidae

Chinchilla rats or chinchillones are members of the family Abrocomidae. This family has few members compared to most rodent families with only 9 known living species. They resemble Chinchillas in appearance, with a similar soft fur and silvery-grey color, but have a body-structure more like a short-tailed rat. They are social, tunnel-dwelling animals, and live in the Andes Mountains of South America. They are probably herbivorous, although this is not clear. [more]

Abrocomophagidae

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Abylidae

Abylidae is a family of marine invertebrates in the order Siphonophora. They are colonial, but the colonies can superficially resemble jellyfish; although they appear to be a single organism, each specimen is actually a colony of Siphonophora. [more]

Abyssochrysidae

Abyssochrysidae is a family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Caenogastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Abyssocottidae

The deep-water sculpins are a small family, Abyssocottidae, of sculpins that are almost entirely restricted to Lake Baikal in Siberia, most of them living at depths below 170 m. [more]

Acalyptonotidae

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Acalyptratae

Acalyptratae is a subsection of Schizophora, commonly referred to as the acalyptrate muscoids (or simply acalyptrates). It is a very large assemblage, exhibiting very diverse habits, with one notable and perhaps surprising exception; there are no known acalyptrates that are obligate blood-feeders (hematophagous), though this is a life history that is common throughout the remaining Diptera. [more]

Acanaloniidae

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Acanthametropodidae

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Acanthaspidiidae

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Acanthasteridae

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Acanthinocyathidae

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Acanthisittidae

The New Zealand wrens, Acanthisittidae, are a family of tiny passerines endemic to New Zealand. They were represented by six known species in four or five genera, although only two species survive in two genera today. They are understood to form a distinct lineage within the passerines, but authorities differ on their assignment to the oscines or suboscines (the two suborders that between them make up the Passeriformes). More recent studies suggest that they form a third, most ancient, suborder Acanthisitti and have no living close relatives at all. They are called "wrens" due to similarities in appearance and behaviour to the true wrens (Troglodytidae), but are not members of that family. [more]

Acanthizidae

The Acanthizidae, also known as the Australasian warblers, are a family of passerine birds which include gerygones, thornbills, and scrubwrens. The Acanthizidae consists of small to medium passerine birds, with a total length varying between 8 and 19 cm. They have short rounded wings, slender bills, long legs, and a short tail. Most species have olive, grey, or brown plumage, although some have patches of a brighter yellow. The smallest species of acanthizid, and indeed the smallest Australian passerine, is the Weebill, the largest is the Pilotbird [more]

Acanthobdellidae

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Acanthoceratidae

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Acanthochaetetidae

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Acanthocheilidae

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Acanthochitonidae

Acanthochitonidae is a family of chitons. [more]

Acanthoclinidae

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Acanthocnemidae

Acanthocnemidae is a small family of beetles, in the suborder Polyphaga. The single species of Acanthocnemidae, Acanthocnemus nigricans, is native to Australia. [more]

Acanthocollaritrematidae

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Acanthocolpidae

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Acanthocotylidae

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Acanthodidae

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Acanthodrilidae

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Acanthogammaridae

Acanthogammaridae is a family of amphipod crustaceans, endemic to Lake Baikal. It contains the following subfamilies and genera: [more]

Acanthogorgiidae

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Acanthograptidae

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Acanthomeniidae

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Acanthonematidae

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Acanthonotozomatidae

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Acanthonotozomellidae

Acanthonotozomatidae is a family of Amphipoda comprising five genera (including those previously placed in the family Acanthonotozomellidae): [more]

Acanthopteroctetidae

Acanthoctesia or "archaic sun moths" is an infraorder of insects in the Lepidopteran order, containing a single superfamily Acanthopteroctetoidea and a single family Acanthopteroctetidae. They are currently considered the fifth group up on the comb of branching events in the extant lepidopteran phylogeny (Kristensen and Skalski, 1999: 10). They also represent the most basal lineage in the lepidopteran group Coelolepida (Wiegmann et al., 2002) (along with Lophocoronoidea and the massive group "Myoglossata") characterised in part by its scale morphology (Kristensen, 1999: 53-54). Moths in this superfamily are usually small (but one is 15 mm. in wingspan) and iridescent. Like other "homoneurous" Coelolepida and non-ditrysian Heteroneura, the ocelli are lost. There are variety of unique structural characteristics (see Kristensen, 1999: 53-54 for an overview). There are two described genera of these primitive moths. Catapterix was originally described within its own family (Sinev, 1988) but Acanthopteroctetes shares with it a number of specialised structural features including similar wing morphology (in A. unifascia) (Nielsen and Kristensen, 1996: 1255). [more]

Acanthosomatidae

Acanthosomatidae is a family of Hemiptera, commonly named ?shield bugs,? for which Kumar in his World revision recognizes 47 genera; now this number is 54 genera, with about 200 species, and is one of the least diversified families within Pentatomoidea. [more]

Acanthostegidae

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Acanthostomatidae

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Acanthostomidae

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Acanthotelsonidae

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Acanthothirididae

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Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae ("thorn tails") is the family of surgeonfishes, tangs, and unicornfishes. The family includes about 80 species in six genera, all of which are marine fish living in tropical seas, usually around coral reefs. Many of the species are brightly colored and popular for aquaria. [more]

Acantiophoridae

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Acaremyidae

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Acaridae

The Acaridae are a family of mites. Common forms include some mold mites, for example the grain mite. Genera in the family include: [more]

Acarnidae

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Acaronychidae

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Acarophenacidae

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Acartiidae

Acartiidae is a family of calanoid copepods distinguishable by the rostral margin not being extended. They are epipelagic, planktonic animals, not being found below a depth of 500 metres (1,600 ft). There are over 100 described species distributed throughout the world's oceans, mainly in temperate areas. [more]

Acartophthalmidae

Acartophthalmus is a genus of flies, the only genus in the family Acartophthalmidae. They are 1.0?2.5 millimetres (0.04?0.10 in) long, and grey or black in color, with pubescent arista. Only four species are included, all of which are Holarctic; two of the species occur in the United Kingdom. There is also an uncertain fossil species. [more]

Acastidae

Acastidae is a family of trilobites in the order Phacopidae, suborder Phacopina, superfamily Acastoidea, containing the following genera: [more]

Acaulidae

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Acavidae

Acavidae is a taxonomic family of air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Acavoidea (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Accacoeliidae

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Accipitridae

The Accipitridae, one of the two major families within the order Accipitriformes (the diurnal birds of prey), are a family of small to large birds with strongly hooked bills and variable morphology based on diet. They feed on a range of prey items from insects to medium-sized mammals, with a number feeding on carrion and a few feeding on fruit. The Accipitridae have a cosmopolitan distribution, being found on all the world's continents (except Antarctica) and a number of oceanic island groups. Some species are migratory. [more]

Acerentomidae

Acerentomidae is a family of hexapods in the order Protura. Acerentomids are not tracheated, and instead utilize cuticular gas exchange. [more]

Acestrorhynchidae

Acestrorhynchus ("needle jaw" ) is a genus of 14 species of characiform fish found only in freshwater in South America, the sole genus in the family Acestrorhynchidae. Their greatest diversity is in the Orinoco and Amazon basins. [more]

Achatinellidae

Achatinellidae is a family of tropical air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Achatinelloidea. [more]

Achatinidae

Achatinidae (New Latin, from Greek "agate") is a family of medium to large sized tropical land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks from Africa. The family includes some 13 genera. [more]

Achilidae

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Achilixiidae

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Achillurbaniidae

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Achipteriidae

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Achiridae

The American soles are a family (Achiridae) of flatfish occurring in both freshwater and marine environments of the Americas. The family includes about 28 species in nine genera. These are closely related to the soles (Soleidae), and have been classified as a subfamily of it, but achirids have a number of distinct characteristics. [more]

Achiropsettidae

The southern (or armless) flounders are a small family of flounders found in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic waters. There are six species of southern flounders in four genera. [more]

Achistridae

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Acholadidae

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Achramorphidae

Achramorphidae is a family of the order Leucosolenida. [more]

Achromadoridae

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Aciculidae

The Aciculidae are a family of minute land snails which have opercula. (An operculum is a little door that closes the shell when the animal retracts into it.) In other words, Aciculidae are terrestrial operculate gastropods. Even though Aciculidae are land snails, they live in rather wet conditions, among mosses and dead leaves and they have sometimes been described as "winkles come ashore". [more]

Acipenseridae

Sturgeon is the common name used for some 26 species of fish in the family Acipenseridae, including the genera Acipenser, Huso, Scaphirhynchus and Pseudoscaphirhynchus. The term includes over 20 species commonly referred to as sturgeon and several closely related species that have distinct common names, notably sterlet, kaluga and beluga. Collectively, the family is also known as the true sturgeons. Sturgeon is sometimes used more exclusively to refer to the species in the two best-known genera, Acipenser and Huso. [more]

Acleistoceratidae

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Acleistorhinidae

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Aclerdidae

Aclerdidae are a family of Coccoidea, the scale insects. They are usually found on grasses, sucking sap from the stem, inside the leaf sheaths. [more]

Aclididae

Aclididae is a family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks, in the superfamily Eulimoidea. [more]

Aclopidae

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Acmaeidae

Lottiidae is a family of sea snails, specifically true limpets, marine gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Lottioidea and the clade Patellogastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Acochlidiidae

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Acoetidae

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Acoleidae

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Acontiophoridae

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Acoraniidae

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Acrididae

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Acrobatidae

Acrobatidae is a small family of gliding marsupials containing two genera, each with a single species, the Feathertail Glider (Acrobates pygmaeus) from Australia and Feather-tailed Possum (Distoechurus pennatus) from New Guinea. [more]

Acrocephalitidae

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Acroceridae

Acroceridae is a small family of odd looking flies most closely related to Nemestrinidae. There are about 520 species in 50 genera. They are characterized by a humpbacked appearance and a small head, sometimes with a long proboscis for nectar. As such, acrocerids are commonly known as small-headed flies or hunchback-flies. Many are bee or wasp mimics. Their eyes are often holoptic; their heads seem to be composed primarily of ommatidia. They are cosmopolitan in distribution but rarely observed in most places; the majority of the over 500 species are known from fewer than 10 specimens. They are found most commonly in semi-arid tropical locations. [more]

Acrochordiceratidae

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Acrochordidae

The Acrochordidae are a monotypic family created for the genus Acrochordus. This is a group of primitive aquatic snakes found in Australia and Indonesia. Currently, 3 species are recognized. [more]

Acrocirridae

Acrocirridae is a family of polychaete worms. Acrocirrids are detritivores (deposit feeders), catching falling particles with numerous long prostomial tentacles. There are eight known genera, and at least 21 described species and subspecies within the Acrocirridae family. The acrocirrids are primarily benthic (seabed-dwelling) animals, but at least two genera (Swima and Teuthidodrilus) appear to have evolved or adapted to a pelagic (free-swimming) habitat. [more]

Acrodelphinidae

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Acrolepidae

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Acrolepiidae

The Acrolepiidae family of moths are also known as False Diamondback moths. [more]

Acrolophidae

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Acroloxidae

Acroloxidae, commonly known as river limpets, are a taxonomic family of very small, freshwater snails, aquatic pulmonate gastropod limpet-like mollusks with a simple flattened conical shell in the clade Hygrophila. [more]

Acromantidae

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Acropomatidae

Acropomatidae, also known as the lanternbellies or the temperate ocean-basses, is a family of perciform fish consisting of 33 marine species. Members of Acropoma are notable for having light-emitting organs alongside their undersides. They are found in all temperate and tropical oceans, usually at depths of several hundred meters. [more]

Acroporidae

Acroporidae is a family of small polyped stony corals in the phylum Cnidaria. The name is derived from the Greek "akron" meaning "summit" and refers to the presence of a corallite at the tip of each branch of coral. They are commonly known as staghorn corals and are grown in aquaria by reef hobbyists. [more]

Acroreiidae

? Acroreiidae is an extinct family of air-breathing snails, pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Siphonariidae. The living siphonariids are all marine pulmonates, false sea limpets that breathe air. [more]

Acrosaleniidae

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Acrospiriferidae

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Acrothelidae

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Acrotretidae

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Acrumenidae

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Actaeciidae

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Actaeonellidae

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Acteonellidae

Acteonellidae is an extinct family of gastropods in the informal group Lower Heterobranchia (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Acteonidae

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Acteoninidae

Acteoninidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Caenogastropoda. [more]

Actinacididae

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Actinastreidae

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Actinernidae

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Actiniidae

The Actiniidae is the largest family of sea anemones, to which most common, temperate, shore species belong. Most members of this family do not participate in symbioses with fishes. One exception is the so-called bubble anemone - Entacmaea quadricolor. [more]

Actinoceratidae

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Actinocrinitidae

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Actinocyclidae

Actinocyclidae is a family of sea slugs, dorid nudibranchs, marine gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Doridoidea. This family is within the clade Euctenidiacea. [more]

Actinodendronidae

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Actinodiscidae

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Actinolaimidae

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Actinolepidae

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Actinopodidae

The spider family Actinopodidae is a family of mygalomorph spiders found in Australia, South America, and Central America. It includes the Australian genus Missulena, known as the mouse spiders, which are quite venomous. [more]

Actinoposthiidae

Actinoposthiidae is a family of flatworms. [more]

Actinoscyphiidae

The Venus flytrap sea anemone is a large sea anemone resembling a Venus Flytrap. It closes its tentacles to capture prey or to protect itself. It is found in the Gulf of Mexico.[] [more]

Actinostolidae

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Actinostromarianinidae

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Actinostromariidae

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Actinostromatidae

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Actisecidae

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Acuariidae

Acuariidae is a family of spirurian nematodes. Like all nematodes, they have neither a circulatory nor a respiratory system. They are the only family in superfamily Acuarioidea, and number about 40 genera and 300 species, most of which are parasites of birds.. [more]

Acucapitidae

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Aculagnathidae

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Aculeorhynchidae

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Acutichitonidae

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Adamystidae

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Adapidae

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Adapisoricidae

Adapisoriculidae is an extinct family of placental mammals present during the Paleocene and possibly Cretaceous. They were once thought to be members of the order Erinaceomorpha, closely related to the Hedgehog family (Erinaceidae), because of their similar dentition, but they are now thought to be basal Euarchontans. They were also thought to be Marsupials at one point. They were small placentals of about 15 cm long, with a tail of equal length. They were probably nocturnal, eating insects and fruits. [more]

Adapisoriculidae

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Addisoniidae

Addisoniidae is a family of sea snails, deepwater true limpets, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Vetigastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Adelgidae

The Adelgidae is a small family of the Homoptera closely related to the aphids, and often traditionally included in the Aphidoidea with the Phylloxeridae. Adelgids are often known as "woolly conifer aphids". The family is composed of species associated with pine spruce or other conifers, known respectively as "pine aphids" or "spruce aphids". This family includes the former family Chermesidae, or "Chermidae", the name of which was declared invalid by the ICZN in 1955. There is still considerable debate as to the number of genera within the family, and the classification is still unstable and inconsistent among competing authors. [more]

Adelidae

The Adelidae or fairy longhorn moths are a family of monotrysian moths in the lepidopteran infraorder Heteroneura. Most species have at least partially metallic patterns coloration and are diurnal, sometimes swarming around the tips of branches with an undulating flight. Others are crepuscular and have a drab coloration. Fairy longhorn moths have a wingspan of 4-28 millimeters, and males often have especially long antennae, 1-3 times as long as the forewing. [more]

Adelobothriidae

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Adelphacaridae

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Ademosynidae

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Adensuidae

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Adeonellidae

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Adeonidae

The Adeonidae is a family within the bryozoan order Cheilostomata. Colonies are often upright bilaminar branches or sheets, perforated by large holes in some species (e.g. ). The zooids generally have one or more adventitious avicularia on their frontal wall. Instead of ovicells the adeonids often possess enlarged polymorphs which brood the larvae internally. [more]

Adeorbidae

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Aderidae

Aderidae, the ant-like leaf beetles, is a family of beetles that bear some resemblance to ants. The family consists of about 1,000 species in about 50 genera, of which most are tropical, although overall distribution is worldwide. [more]

Adhaesozetidae

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Adianthidae

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Adiaphorostreptidae

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Adiheterothripidae

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Adinetidae

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Adocidae

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Adociidae

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Adolfiidae

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Adrianichthyidae

The ricefishes are a family (Adrianichthyidae) of small ray-finned fish that are found in fresh and brackish waters from India to Japan and out into the Indo-Australian Archipelago, most notably Sulawesi. The common name of the group derives from the fact that many species are found in Japanese rice paddies. About 27 species, some extremely rare and endangered, and some 2-4 may already be extinct. [more]

Adrianitidae

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Adritylidae

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Adumbratomorphidae

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Adygeyidae

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Aechminidae

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Aegialiidae

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Aegialodontidae

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Aegialornithidae

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Aegidae

Aegidae is a family of isopod crustaceans, containing the following genera: [more]

Aeginellidae

Caprellidae is a family of amphipods commonly known as skeleton shrimps. Their common name denotes the threadlike slender body which allows them to virtually disappear among the fine filaments of seaweed, hydroids and bryozoans. They are sometimes also known as ghost shrimps. Caprellidae contains 88 genera in three subfamilies. [more]

Aeginidae

Aeginidae is a family of jellyfish in the order Narcomedusae. Most of the genera include only a single species. [more]

Aegiretidae

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Aegiridae

Aegires is a genus of dorid nudibranch that feeds exclusively on calcareous sponges. Images of its radula can be seen at Biologie 66: 29?40. 1996. http://www.bentart.es/articulos/Troncoso_et_al__Opistobranchia_Bull_Belg.pdf.  and W?Gele, H. (1987). "Redescription and anatomy of Aegires (Anaegires) albus Thiele, 1912 (Opisthobranchia, Doridacea) and synonymy with A. Protectus Odhner, 1934". Polar Biology 7 (5): 267?272. doi:10.1007/BF00443944edit [more]

Aegisthidae

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Aegithalidae

The long-tailed tits or bushtits, Aegithalidae, are a family of small passerine birds. The family contains 13 species in four genera. [more]

Aegithinidae

The ioras are a family, Aegithinidae, of small passerine bird species found in India and southeast Asia. The family has only four species in a single genus, Aegithina. They are one of only three bird families that are entirely endemic to the Indomalayan ecozone. They were formerly grouped with the other two of those families, the leafbirds and fairy-bluebirds, in the family Irenidae. [more]

Aeglidae

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Aegothelidae

Owlet-nightjars are small nocturnal birds related to the nightjars and frogmouths. Most are native to New Guinea, but some species extend to Australia, the Moluccas, and New Caledonia. A New Zealand species is extinct. There is a single monotypic family Aegothelidae with the genus Aegotheles. [more]

Aenicteguidae

Aenictegues is the only genus of mites in the family Aenicteguidae, in the order Mesostigmata. [more]

Aenigmastrophiidae

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Aenigmephemeridae

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Aeolidiidae

Aeolidiidae, the aeolid nudibranchs, are a family of Nudibranchs. Many feed on hydroids(anemones) and thus have highly serrated radular teeth. [more]

Aeolosomatidae

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Aeolothripidae

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Aepyornithidae

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Aequoreidae

Aequoreidae is a hydrozoan family. There are approximately 30 known species found in temperate and tropical marine coastal environments. Aequoreids include Aequorea victoria, the organism from which the green fluorescent protein gene was isolated. [more]

Aerobiotrematidae

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Aeroglyphidae

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Aeropsidae

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Aeshnidae

The hawkers (or darners in North America) (family Aeshnidae) include the largest dragonflies found in North America and Europe, and are among the largest of the dragonflies on the planet. This family represents also the fastest flying dragonflies of the order of the dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata). [more]

Aetalionidae

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Aeteidae

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Aethridae

Aethridae is a family of crabs in its own superfamily, Aethroidea. It contains the following genera (extinct genera marked ?): [more]

Aetideidae

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Aetiocetidae

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Aetosauridae

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Afrauropodidae

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Afrotarsiidae

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Agalmidae

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Agamidae

Agamids, lizards of the family Agamidae, include more than 300 species in Africa, Asia, Australia, and a few in Southern Europe. Many species are commonly called dragons or dragon lizards. [more]

Agaonidae

Fig wasps are wasps of the family Agaonidae which pollinate figs or are otherwise associated with figs, a coevolutional relationship that has been developing for at least 80 million years. They have been seen to fly farther than any known pollen-bearing insect, and in some regions of the world where wind can gust at up to 30 kilometres per hour (19 mph), they can travel downwind approximately 100 miles in their 48-hour lifespan. [more]

Agariciidae

Agariciidae is a family of reef building stony corals. This family includes cactus corals, elephant skin corals, plate corals and lettuce corals. Members of the family include symbiotic algae called Zooxanthellae in their tissues which help provide their energy requirements. [more]

Agatheliidae

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Agathiceratidae

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Agathiphagidae

Agathiphaga is a genus of moths in the family Agathiphagidae, known as kauri moths. This caddis fly-like lineage of primitive moths was first reported by Lionel Jack Dumbleton in 1952, as a new genus of Micropterigidae. [more]

Agathotanaidae

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Agelacrinitidae

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Agelasidae

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Agelenidae

The araneomorph funnel-web spiders of the family Agelenidae include the common grass spiders of the genus Agelenopsis, as well as the purportedly venomous European hobo spider, Tegenaria agrestis, which has been introduced into the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Note: The araneomorph funnel-web spider should not to be confused with the funnel-web tarantula and the venomous funnel-web tarantula, both of which are members of the suborder Mygalomorphae. The venomous funnel-web tarantulas include the infamous Sydney funnel-web spider. [more]

Ageneiosidae

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Agfidae

Agfa is a genus of parasitic nematodes in the family Agfidae. They are parasiting in land gastropods. [more]

Aglajidae

Aglajidae is a family of often colorful, medium-sized, sea slugs, marine opisthobranch gastropod mollusks. These are not nudibranchs; instead they are headshield slugs, in the clade Cephalaspidea. [more]

Aglaopheniidae

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Aglaspididae

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Aglithodictyidae

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Aglycyderidae

Aglycyderini are a tribe of belids, primitive weevils of the family Belidae. Like in other belids, their antennae are straight, not elbowed as in the true weevils (Curculionidae). They occur only on the Pacific Islands and in the Macaronesian region.. [more]

Agnaridae

Agnaridae is a family of woodlice. They were formerly considered part of the , but were moved from that family to Porcellionidae in 1989, and then placed as a separate family in 2003. There are c.?80 species, distributed from the Mediterranean basin to East Asia. [more]

Agnathiellidae

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Agnesiidae

Agnesiidae is a family of tunicates in the order Enterogona. [more]

Agneziidae

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Agnopteridae

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Agnostidae

Agnostidae is a family of agnostid trilobites. Like most agnostids, they were eyeless and only bore two thoracic segments. They ranged in benthic waters across the globe from 530 to 461 million years ago, containing the following genera, among others: [more]

Agoniatitidae

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Agonidae

The poachers are a family (Agonidae) of small bottom-dwelling cold-water marine fish. They are also known as alligatorfishes, starsnouts, hooknoses, and rockheads. Poachers are notable for having elongated bodies covered by scales modified into bony plates, and for using their large pectoral fins to move in short bursts. The family includes about 47 species in some 20 genera, some of which are quite widespread. [more]

Agonoxenidae

The Agonoxenidae are a family of moths only contains four named species in the whole world ? all in the type genus ? if (e.g. following Nielsen et al., 1996) the Blastodacnidae are considered to be a separate family. Such a monotypic arrangement is fairly unusual in modern taxonomy without explicit need due to phylogenetic constraints, and with little reliable data on the latter, the traditional approach is followed here pending new studies. [more]

Agoristenidae

[more]

Agorophiidae

[more]

Agoutidae

[more]

Agraulidae

[more]

Agriochoeridae

[more]

Agriolimacidae

Agriolimacidae is a family of small and medium sized land slugs, or shell-less snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks. [more]

Agromyzidae

The family Agromyzidae is commonly referred to as the leaf-miner flies, for the feeding habit of larvae, most of which are leaf miners on various plants. [more]

Agyrtidae

Agyrtidae or primitive carrion beetles are a small family of polyphagan beetles They are found in mostly temperate areas of the northern hemisphere and in New Zealand. They are feeding on decaying organic material. [more]

Aigialosauridae

Aigialosauridae (Greek, aigialos = "seashore" + sauros= lizard) is family of Late Cretaceous semi-aquatic varanoid lizards, regarded by some paleontologists to form distinct monophyletic group and by others as an adaptive grade within the basal mosasauroids. [more]

Aillyidae

[more]

Ailoscolecidae

[more]

Ailuridae

Ailuridae is a family in the mammal order Carnivora. The family includes the Red Panda (the sole living representative) and its extinct relatives. [more]

Aipichthyidae

[more]

Aiptasiidae

[more]

Aiptasiomorphidae

[more]

Ajacicyathidae

[more]

Akeridae

Akeridae is a small taxonomic family of sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs belonging to the superfamily Akeroidea, the sea hares. The family, in its original spelling "Aceridae", has previously been attributed in error to Pilsbry, 1893. [more]

Akysidae

The stream catfishes are family Akysidae of catfishes. [more]

Alabushevothyrididae

[more]

Alagomyidae

[more]

Alaimidae

[more]

Alatosporidae

[more]

Alaudidae

Larks are passerine birds of the family Alaudidae. All species occur in the Old World, and in northern and eastern Australia; only one, the Shore Lark, has spread to North America, where it is called the Horned Lark. Habitats vary widely, but many species live in dry regions. [more]

Alaysiidae

[more]

Albanerpetontidae

[more]

Albionbaataridae

Albionbaataridae is a family of small, extinct mammals within the order Multituberculata. Fossil remains are known from the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous of Europe and Asia. These herbivores lived their obscure lives during the Mesozoic, also known as the "age of the dinosaurs." They were among the more derived representatives of the informal suborder "Plagiaulacida". The taxon Albionbaataridae was named by Kielan-Jaworowska Z. and Ensom P.C. in 1994. [more]

Albireonidae

[more]

Albulatrematidae

[more]

Albulidae

The bonefishes are a family (Albulidae) of ray-finned fish that are popular as game fish in Florida, select locations in the South Pacific, and the Bahamas (where two bonefish are featured on the 10 cent coin) and elsewhere. The family is small, with twelve species in two genera. [more]

Albumaresidae

[more]

Albuneidae

Albuneidae is a little-known family of specialized burrowing sand crabs. There are 50 extant species as well as nine fossil species that have been described. Fossil specimens have been described from the Cretaceous, Miocene and Oligocene. [more]

Alcedinidae

The river kingfishers or Alcedinidae, are one of the three families of bird in the kingfisher group. The Alcedinidae once included all kingfishers, before the widespread recognition of Halcyonidae (tree-kingfishers) and Cerylidae (water-kingfishers). The family is widespread through Africa, through east and south Asia as far as Australia, with one species, the Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) also appearing in Europe and northern Asia. The origin of the family is thought to have been in Asia. [more]

Alcidae

An auk is a bird of the family Alcidae in the order Charadriiformes. Auks are superficially similar to penguins due to their black-and-white colors, their upright posture and some of their habits. Nevertheless they are not closely related to penguins, but rather are believed to be an example of moderate convergent evolution. [more]

Alciopidae

[more]

Alcyonidiidae

[more]

Alcyoniidae

Alcyoniidae is a family of leathery or soft corals in the phylum Cnidaria. [more]

Aldanellidae

Aldanellidae is an extinct family of paleozoic molluscs that have been assigned to the Gastropod stem group but may also belong to a paraphyletic "Monoplacophora". [more]

Aldisidae

Aldisa is a genus of small sea slugs, dorid nudibranchs in the family Dorididae within the clade Euthyneura. [more]

Alectonidae

[more]

Alepisauridae

Lancetfishes are large oceanic predatory fishes in the genus Alepisaurus ("Scaleless lizard"), the only living genus in the family Alepisauridae. [more]

Alepocephalidae

Slickheads or nakedheads are a family, Alepocephalidae, of marine smelts. They are deep-water fishes most common below 1,000 metres (3,300 ft). They get their name from the lack of scales on the head. Some authors include Bathylaconidae in this family. [more]

Alestiidae

African tetras (family Alestidae, formerly spelled Alestiidae) are a group of Characiformes fish exclusively found in Africa. This family contains about 18 genera and 110 species. Among the best known members are the Congo tetra, and African Tigerfish. [more]

Aleurodamaeidae

[more]

Alexornithidae

[more]

Aleyrodidae

The whiteflies, comprising only the family Aleyrodidae, are small hemipterans. More than 1550 species have been described. Whiteflies typically feed on the underside of plant leaves. [more]

Algophagidae

[more]

Aliciidae

Aliciidae is a family of sea anemones, comprising the following genera: [more]

Alicorhagiidae

[more]

Alinkidae

[more]

Alirhabditidae

[more]

Allagecrinidae

[more]

Allanicytidiidae

[more]

Allantonematidae

[more]

Allassogonoporidae

[more]

Alleculidae

[more]

Alligatoridae

[more]

Allochaetophoridae

[more]

Allocrangonyctidae

Allocrangonyx is a genus of troglobitic amphipod crustaceans from the South Central United States. The two species are both listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. The animals are blind and unpigmented. During the male's development, the outer ramus of the third uropod differentiates into secondary segments and grows to a length greater than the animal's body length. [more]

Allocreadiidae

[more]

Allodesmatidae

[more]

Alloionematidae

[more]

Allomicrocotylidae

[more]

Allomyidae

[more]

Alloniscidae

[more]

Allophrynidae

The Tukeit Hill Frog (Allophryne ruthveni) is one of the two described species in the genus Allophryne (the other one being ), which in turn is the only member of the subfamily Allophryninae, a clade recently placed under the family Centrolenidae (elevated by some authors to the rank of a separate family Allophrynidae). These frogs live in Guyana, Venezuela, Surinam, Brazil and Bolivia. The holotype was discovered at Tukeit Hill, below Kaieteur Falls, Guyana, hence the common English name. [more]

Allopocockiidae

[more]

Alloposidae

The Seven-arm Octopus (Haliphron atlanticus) is the largest known species of octopus based on scientific records, with a total estimated length of 4 m and mass of 75 kg. However, there have been claims of even larger octopuses of the species Enteroctopus dofleini. [more]

Alloptidae

[more]

Allopyragraphoridae

[more]

Alloraphidiidae

[more]

Allorhynchidae

[more]

Allosauridae

[more]

Allothrissopidae

[more]

Allothyridae

[more]

Alluroididae

[more]

Almidae

[more]

Alokistocaridae

Alokistocaridae is a family of extinct trilobites. Alokistocarids were particle feeders and left small furrows with are occasionally preserved. Their remains are found worldwide. A notable genus of Alokistocarid is Elrathia, one of the most common trilobites in the world. [more]

Alopiidae

Thresher sharks are large lamniform sharks of the family Alopiidae. Found in all temperate and tropical oceans of the world, the family contains three species all within the genus Alopias. [more]

Alpheidae

Alpheidae is a family of caridean snapping shrimp characterized by having asymmetrical claws, the larger of which is typically capable of producing a loud snapping sound. Other common names of these species include pistol shrimp or alpheid shrimp. [more]

Alpinophylliidae

[more]

Alsataspidae

[more]

Alucitidae

The Alucitidae or many-plumed moths are a family of moths with unusually modified wings. Both fore- and hind-wings consist of about six rigid spines, from which radiate flexible bristles creating a structure similar to a bird's feather. [more]

Alvarezsauridae

[more]

Alveolitidae

[more]

Alvinellidae

The Alvinellidae are a family of small, deep-sea polychaete worms endemic to hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean. Belonging to the order Terebellida, the family contains two genera, Alvinella and Paralvinella; the former genus contains two valid species and the latter eight. Members of the family are termed alvinellids. [more]

Alvinocarididae

Alvinocarididae is a family of shrimp, originally described by M. L. Christoffersen in 1986 from samples collected by DSV Alvin, from which they derive their name. Shrimp of the family Alvinocarididae generally inhabit deep sea hydrothermal vent regions, and hydrocarbon cold seep environments. Carotenoid pigment has been found in their bodies. The family Alvinocarididae comprises 7 extant genera. [more]

Alycaeidae

Cyclophoridae is a taxonomic family of small to large tropical land snails with an operculum, terrestrial gastropod mollusks in the informal group Architaenioglossa belonging to the clade Caenogastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Alydidae

Alydidae, commonly known as broad-headed bugs, is a family of true bugs very similar to the closely related Coreidae (leaf-footed bugs and relatives). There are about 40 genera with 250 species altogether. Distributed in the temperate and warmer regions of the Earth, most are tropical and subtropical animals; for example Europe has a mere 10 species, and only 2 of these occur outside the Mediterranean region. [more]

Alysidiidae

[more]

Alytidae

Discoglossidae is a family of primitive frogs, with the common name Disc-Tongued Frogs. Most are endemic to Europe, but there are also three species in North-West Africa, and an extinct species formerly occurred in Israel. [more]

Amabiliidae

[more]

Amacataidae

[more]

Amaltheidae

Amaltheidae is a family of eoderoceratacean ammonitids from the Lower Jurassic consisting of genera characterised by stigated discoidal oxycones?narrow involute shells with narrowly rounded to angular venters that bear a series of grooves, or ridges, along broad flanks, which according to the Treatise L, 1957, evolved into strongly ribbed planulates (discoidal evolute shells) with quadrate whorls, typically with crenulated keels; involving all together four genera. [more]

Amarsipidae

Amarsipus carlsbergi is a small and slender type of fish that lives in equatorial parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It is the only species in the family Amarsipidae. [more]

Amaryllididae

Amaryllididae is a family of marine benthic amphipods found throughout the southern hemisphere. These smooth, laterally compressed amphipods can be distinguished by the accessory setal row of the mandible having a distal tuft. It contains the following genera: [more]

Amastridae

Amastridae is a taxonomic family of small, air-breathing, land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Cochlicopoidea. [more]

Amathillopsidae

[more]

Amathinidae

Amathinidae, is a taxonomic family mostly consisting of small and minute sea snails, marine heterobranch gastropod molluscs or micromolluscs in the superfamily Pyramidelloidea. [more]

Amaurobiidae

The Amaurobiidae are three-clawed cribellate or ecribellate spiders found in most parts of the world and difficult to distinguish from related spiders in other families, especially Agelenidae, Desidae and Amphinectidae. Their intra- and interfamilial relationships are contentious. In Spider Families of the World 2007 they were represented by 69 genera and about 640 species in 5 subfamilies. [more]

Ambassidae

The Asiatic glassfishes are a family, Ambassidae, of freshwater and marine fishes in the order Perciformes. The species in the family are native to the waters of Asia and Oceania and the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. The family includes eight genera and about fifty species. [more]

Amberleyidae

Amberleyidae is an extinct family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Vetigastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Amblycipitidae

Amblycipitidae is a family of catfishes, commonly known as torrent catfishes. It includes three genera, Amblyceps, Liobagrus, and Xiurenbagrus. [more]

Amblyopsidae

The fish family Amblyopsidae are commonly referred to as cavefish, blindfish, or swampfish. They are small freshwater fish found in the dark environments of swamps, caves and deep lakes. Family members exhibit adaptations to these dark environments, including the lack of functional eyes and, in some species, the absence of pigmentation. There are more than 80 known varieties of cavefish. [more]

Amblypteridae

[more]

Ambocoeliidae

[more]

Ambonychiidae

[more]

Ambulocetidae

[more]

Ambunguipedidae

[more]

Ambystomatidae

The mole salamanders (genus Ambystoma) are a group of salamanders endemic to North America, the only genus in the family Ambystomatidae. The group has become famous due to the presence of the Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), widely used in research, and the Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum, Ambystoma mavortium) which is the official amphibian of many states, and often sold as a pet. [more]

Ameiridae

[more]

Ameletidae

[more]

Americobdellidae

[more]

Ameridae

[more]

Amerobelbidae

[more]

Ameronothridae

[more]

Ameroseiidae

[more]

Ametropodidae

[more]

Amidostomatidae

[more]

Amiidae

Amiidae is a family of primitive ray-finned fish. Only one species, Amia calva, the bowfin, survives today, although additional species in all four subfamilies are known from Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Eocene fossils. [more]

Amilnedwardsiidae

[more]

Amiskwiidae

[more]

Ammodesmidae

[more]

Ammodytidae

A sand lance or sandlance is a fish belonging to the family Ammodytidae. Several species of sand lance are commonly known as "sand eels" or "sandeels", though they are not related to true eels. Another variant name is launce, and all names of the fish are references to its slender body and pointed snout. The family name (and genus name, ) means "sand burrower", which describes the sand lance's habit of burrowing into sand to avoid tidal currents. [more]

Ammonitellidae

[more]

Ammotheidae

[more]

Ammotrechidae

[more]

Ammoxenidae

The Ammoxenidae are a small spider family with 18 species in four genera. [more]

Amnicolidae

Amnicolidae is a family of small freshwater snails with a gill and an operculum, aquatic gastropod mollusks. [more]

Amoenacaridae

[more]

Amorphoscelididae

[more]

Ampeliscidae

Ampeliscidae is a family of amphipods, distinct enough to warrant placement in a monotypic superfamily Ampeliscoidea. They are benthic, found at the bottom of seas and oceans. They are distributed worldwide, and are often abundant in areas with fine sediments. They live in infaunal tubes, constructed from "amphipod silk" and sediment. [more]

Ampezzanildidae

The Ampezzanildidae is an extinct taxonomic family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the informal group Lower Heterobranchia. [more]

Ampharetidae

Ampharetidae are a family of terebellid "bristle worm" (class Polychaeta). As such, they belong to the order Canalipalpata, one of the three main clades of polychaetes. They appear to be most closely related to the peculiar alvinellids (Alvinellidae) which inhabit the deep sea, and somewhat less closely to the well-known trumpet worms (Pectinariidae). These three appear to form one of the main clades of terebellids. [more]

Amphiastraeidae

[more]

Amphiastreidae

[more]

Amphibamidae

[more]

Amphibolidae

Amphibolidae is a family of air-breathing snails with opercula, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod molluscs. [more]

Amphibulimidae

[more]

Amphicentridae

[more]

Amphicotylidae

[more]

Amphicyonidae

Amphicyonidae is an extinct family of large terrestrial carnivores belonging to the suborder Caniformia (meaning "dog-like") and which inhabited North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa from the Middle Eocene subepoch to the Pleistocene epoch 46.2?1.8 Mya, existing for approximately 44.4 million years. [more]

Amphidontidae

The Amphidontidae are a family of extinct mammals from the Early Creataceous, belonging to the triconodonts. It contains most of the species previously belonged to Amphilestidae. [more]

Amphientomidae

Amphientomidae is a family of Psocoptera belonging to the suborder Troctomorpha. The presence of scales on their wings gives them a superficial resemblance to the unrelated family socoptera, Trogiomorpha) and both families can pass for microlepidoptera to the untrained eye. The family comprises 100 species arranged in twenty genera. [more]

Amphignathodontidae

The marsupial frogs are a disputed family (Amphignathodontidae) in the order Anura. Where it is treated as a separate family, it consists of two genera, Gastrotheca, and Flectonotus. These frogs are native to Neotropical America (Central America & South America). Under other classifications, these are treated as part of family Hemiphractidae. There is still an active question as to which classification is correct. [more]

Amphilectidae

[more]

Amphilemuridae

[more]

Amphilepididae

Amphilepididae are a small family of brittle stars of the suborder Gnathophiurina. It contains one genus (Amphilepis) and the following species: [more]

Amphilestidae

[more]

Amphiliidae

Loach catfishes, Amphiliidae, are a family of catfishes (order Siluriformes). They are widespread in tropical Africa but are most common in streams at high elevations; most species are able to cling to rocks in fast-flowing streams. There are 13 genera and 68 species. [more]

Amphilinidae

[more]

Amphilochidae

Amphilochidae is a family of amphipod crustaceans, containing the following genera: [more]

Amphimeniidae

[more]

Amphimerycidae

[more]

Amphinectidae

The Amphinectidae are a spider family with about 180 described species in 35 genera. [more]

Amphinomidae

[more]

Amphionididae

Amphionides reynaudii is the sole representative of the order Amphionidacea, and is a small (less than one inch long) planktonic crustacean found throughout the world's tropical oceans, mostly in shallow waters. [more]

Amphipellidae

[more]

Amphiporidae

[more]

Amphipsocidae

Amphipsocidae is a family of Psocoptera belonging to the suborder Psocomorpha. Like the other members of the infra-order Caeciliusetae, they have a broad, flat labrum, with well defined edges. The family is composed of 170 species arranged in 17 genera. [more]

Amphipterygidae

Amphipterygidae is a family of damselflies in the order Odonata. It is a small family of damselflies with around 12 species. [more]

Amphisbaenia

The Amphisbaenia (or worm lizards) are a usually legless suborder of squamates closely related to lizards and snakes, comprising over 130 extant species. As many species possess a pink body coloration and scales arranged in rings, they have a superficial resemblance to earthworms. They are very poorly understood, due to their burrowing lifestyle and general rarity. Most species are found in Africa and South America, with a few in other parts of the world. Little is known of them outside of their anatomy, and even that is difficult to study due to the mechanics of dissecting something so small. Most species are less than 6 inches (150 mm) long. [more]

Amphisbaenidae

The Amphisbaenidae are a family of amphisbaenians, commonly known as worm lizards. They are found in North and South America, some Caribbean islands, and in sub-Saharan Africa. One deep branching and somewhat aberrant genus, Blanus, is native to Europe, and may represent a distinct family. [more]

Amphisbatidae

[more]

Amphisopodidae

[more]

Amphistiidae

[more]

Amphistrophiidae

[more]

Amphitheridae

[more]

Amphitheriidae

Amphitheriida is an order of mesozoic mammals restricted to the Middle Jurassic of Britain. They were closely related to the Dryolestids but possessed five molars instead of the usual four in Dryolestida, (with the exception of the family Dryolestidae whose members possessed between 8 and 9 molars). The Amphitheriida contains one family, the Amphitheriidae. [more]

Amphithoidae

[more]

Amphitoidae

[more]

Amphitomariidae

The Amphitomariidae is an extinct taxonomic family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the informal group Lower Heterobranchia. [more]

Amphitretidae

Amphitretus is a genus of pelagic gelatinous octopuses. It is the sole genus of family Amphitretidae and consists of 2 species. Some authorities consider as a subspecies of Amphitretus pelagicus, making this family monotypic. [more]

Amphiumidae

A Family in the Kingdom Animalia.[1] [more]

Amphiuridae

Amphiuridae (commonly called long-armed burrowing brittle stars or burrowing brittle stars) are a large family of brittle stars of the suborder Gnathophiurina. Some species are used to study echinoderm development (e.g. and Amphioplus abditus) and bioluminescence (the dwarf brittle star, Amphipholis squamata). [more]

Amphizoidae

Amphizoa is a genus of beetles, placed in its own family, Amphizoidae. It comprises six species, three from western North America and three from China. The vernacular name "trout-stream beetle" comes from the original finding of A. insolens and A. lecontei in high mountain streams, although other species occur at lower elevation. They are notable as a possible intermediate stage between terrestrial and aquatic beetles; while living in the water, they are not good swimmers and physically resemble ground beetles more than other types of water beetle. [more]

Amphoriscidae

Amphoriscidae is a family of the order Leucosolenida. [more]

Amphotrombiidae

[more]

Ampithoidae

[more]

Ampulicidae

The Ampulicidae, or Cockroach wasps, is a small (approx. 200 species), primarily tropical group of sphecoid wasps, all of which use various cockroaches as prey items for their larvae. They tend to have elongated jaws, a pronounced neck-like constriction behind the head, a strongly petiolate abdomen, and deep grooves on the thorax. Many are quite ant-like in appearance, though some are brilliant metallic blue or green. [more]

Ampullaridae

[more]

Ampullariidae

Ampullariidae, common name the apple snails, is a family of large freshwater snails, aquatic gastropod mollusks with a gill and an operculum. This family is in the superfamily Ampullarioidea and is the type family of that superfamily. [more]

Ampullinidae

[more]

Amynodontidae

[more]

Anabantidae

The Anabantidae are a family of perciform fish commonly called the climbing gouramies or climbing perches. As labyrinth fishes, they possess a labyrinth organ, a structure in the fish's head which allows them to breathe atmospheric oxygen. Fish of this family are commonly seen gulping at air at the surface of the water; which then passes out of their gills or mouth when they dive beneath the surface. [more]

Anabaritidae

[more]

Anabathridae

[more]

Anabathronidae

[more]

Anablepidae

Anablepidae is a family of freshwater and brackish water fishes living on river estuaries from southern Mexico to southern South America. There are three genera with sixteen species: the four-eyed fishes (genus Anableps), the onesided livebearers (genus Jenynsia) and the white-eye, Oxyzygonectes dovii. Fish of this family eat mostly insects and other invertebrates. [more]

Anacanthobatidae

The smooth skates or leg skates are the sole genus, Anacanthobatis, of the skate, family Anacanthobatidae. It has ten described species. [more]

Anacoracidae

[more]

Anadenidae

Anadenidae is a taxonomic family of air-breathing land slugs, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Arionidae (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Anadromidae

Anadromidae is an extinct family of gastropods in the clade Eupulmonata (according to taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Anagalidae

[more]

Anajapygidae

Anajapygidae is a small family of diplurans. They can be distinguished by their relatively short, stout cerci, which discharge abdominal secretions. Unlike most diplurans, which are largely predatory, these are scavengers. [more]

Analgidae

[more]

Anamixidae

Leucothoidae is a family of amphipods. It contains 138 species in 6 genera: [more]

Anaperidae

Anaperidae is a family of flatworms. [more]

Anapidae

The Anapidae are a family of rather small spiders with 145 described species in 35 genera. Most species are less than 2 mm long. [more]

Anapronoidae

[more]

Anarcestidae

[more]

Anarhichadidae

The wolffish are a family, Anarhichadidae, of perciform fish. They are native to cold waters of the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, where they live on the continental shelf and slope, to depths of about 600 metres (2,000 ft). They are bottom-feeders, eating hard-shelled invertebrates such as clams, echinoderms and crustaceans, which they crush with strong canine and molar teeth. The longest species, Anarrhichthys ocellatus, grows to more than 2 metres (6.6 ft) in length. [more]

Anarthruridae

[more]

Anaspididae

Anaspididae is a family of freshwater crustacean that is endemic to Tasmania, Australia. The family contains 3 genera and 5 species. This group of crustaceans are considered living fossils. They are commonly and collectively known as the Tasmanian anaspid crustaceans. Anaspidids have stalked eyes, long antennae and antennules, and a slender body with no carapace. The two species of Allanaspides and the single species of Paranaspides are all listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. [more]

Anastomopsidae

?Anastomopsidae is an extinct family of fossil gastropods in the superfamily Punctoidea (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Anatidae

Anatidae is the biological family of birds that includes ducks, geese and swans. The family has a cosmopolitan distribution, occurring on all the world's continents except Antarctica and on most of the world's islands and island groups. These are birds that can swim, float on the water surface, and in some cases dive in at least shallow water. (The Magpie Goose is no longer[] considered to be part of the Anatidae, but is placed in its own family Anseranatidae.) The family contains around 146 species in 40 genera. They are generally herbivorous, and are monogamous breeders. A number of species undertake annual migrations. A few species have been domesticated for agriculture, and many others are hunted for food and recreation. Five species have become extinct since 1600, and many more are threatened with extinction. [more]

Anatinellidae

[more]

Anatomidae

Anatomidae is a family of minute sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Vetigastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Anatonchidae

[more]

Anatylidae

[more]

Anaxyelidae

[more]

Anazygidae

[more]

Anchariidae

[more]

Anchilophidae

[more]

Anchineuridae

[more]

Anchinoidae

[more]

Anchisauridae

[more]

Anchisauripodidae

[more]

Anchistioididae

[more]

Anchitrematidae

[more]

Anchorophoridae

[more]

Ancinidae

[more]

Ancistrocheiridae

The Sharpear Enope Squid (Ancistrocheirus lesueurii) is the only species in the genus Ancistrocheirus and family Ancistrocheiridae. With a mantle length of 25 cm, this moderately sized squid may be found throughout the tropical and subtropical oceans. They tend to be found at mesopelagic depths (200-1000 metres down). [more]

Ancistropsyllidae

[more]

Ancistrorhynchidae

[more]

Ancopteridae

[more]

Ancorabolidae

[more]

Ancorinidae

The Ancorinidae are a family of marine sponges belonging to the order of Astrophorida. [more]

Ancylcoceratidae

[more]

Ancylidae

Ancylini is a tribe of small, freshwater, air-breathing limpets, aquatic pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the family Planorbidae the ram's horn snails and their allies. This tribe was previously considered to be a family; this current taxonomic placement within Planorbidae is according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda (Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Ancyloceratidae

[more]

Ancylostomatidae

[more]

Ancyrocephalidae

[more]

Anderemaeidae

[more]

Andinichthyidae

Andinichthyidae is an extinct family of catfish. [more]

Andrenidae

The family Andrenidae is a large (nearly) cosmopolitan (absent in Australia) non-parasitic bee family, with most of the diversity in temperate and/or arid areas (warm temperate xeric), including some truly enormous genera (e.g., Andrena with over 1300 species, and Perdita with nearly 800). One of the subfamilies, Oxaeinae, are so different in appearance that they were typically accorded family status, but careful phylogenetic analysis reveals them to be an offshoot within the Andrenidae, very close to the Andreninae. [more]

Andresiidae

[more]

Andrognathidae

[more]

Andwakiidae

[more]

Anelasmatidae

[more]

Anelcanidae

[more]

Anenterotrematidae

[more]

Angarosphecidae

[more]

Angelinornithidae

[more]

Angiodictyidae

[more]

Angiostomatidae

Angiostomatidae' is a family of parasitic nematodes. [more]

Anguidae

Anguidae is a large and diverse family of lizards native to the northern hemisphere. The group includes the slowworms, glass lizards, and alligator lizards, among others. Anguidae is divided into three subfamilies and contains 94 species in eight genera. Their closest living relatives are the helodermatid lizards. They have hard osteoderms beneath their scales, and many of the species have reduced or absent limbs, giving them a snake-like appearance, although others are fully limbed. [more]

Anguillavidae

[more]

Anguillicolidae

[more]

Anguillidae

Anguillidae is a family of fishes that contains the freshwater eels. There are 19 species and 6 subspecies in this family, all in genus Anguilla. They are catadromous, meaning they spend their lives in freshwater rivers, lakes, or estuaries and return to the ocean to spawn. The young eel larvae, called leptocephali, live only in the ocean and consume small particles called marine snow. They grow larger in size, and in their next growth stage they are called glass eels. At this stage they enter estuaries and when they become pigmented they are known as elvers. Elvers travel upstream in freshwater rivers where they grow to adulthood. Some details of eel reproduction are as yet unknown, and the discovery of the spawning area of the American and European eels in the Sargasso Sea is one of the more famous anecdotes in the history of Ichthyology (see Eel life history). The spawning areas of some other anguillid eels, such as the Japanese eel, and the giant mottled eel were also discovered recently in the western North Pacific Ocean. [more]

Anguilloididae

[more]

Anguinidae

[more]

Angusticardiniidae

[more]

Angustothyrididae

[more]

Anhangueridae

[more]

Anhimidae

The screamers are a small family of birds, the Anhimidae. For a long time they were thought to be related to the Galliformes because of similar bills, but they are truly related to ducks (family Anatidae), most closely to the Magpie Goose (which some DNA evidence suggests[] are closer to screamers than to ducks). The family is exceptional within the living birds in lacking uncinate processes of ribs. [more]

Anhingidae

The darters or snakebirds are mainly tropical waterbirds in the family Anhingidae. There are four living species, three of which are very common and widespread while the fourth is rarer and classified as near-threatened by the IUCN. The term "snakebird" is usually used without any additions to signify whichever of the completely allopatric species occurs in any one region. It refers to their long thin neck, which has a snake-like appearance when they swim with their bodies submerged, or when mated pairs twist it during their bonding displays. "Darter" is used with a geographical term when referring to particular species. It alludes to their manner of procuring food, as they impale fishes with their thin, pointed beak. The American Darter (A. anhinga) is more commonly known as the Anhinga. It is sometimes called "water turkey" in the southern United States for little clearly apparent reason; though the Anhinga is quite unrelated to the wild turkey, they are both large, blackish birds with long tails that are sometimes hunted for food. [more]

Aniliidae

The Aniliidae are a monotypic family created for the monotypic genus Anilius that contains the species A. scytale, found in South America. This snake possesses a vestigial pelvic girdle that is visible as a pair of cloacal spurs. It is ovoviviparous. The diet consists mainly of amphibians and other reptiles. Currently, two subspecies are recognized, including the typical form described here. [more]

Anisakidae

Anisakidae is a family of intestinal roundworms. They are also called the marine ascarids. The larvae of these worms can cause anisakiasis when ingested by humans, but do not reproduce except in marine mammals or seabirds.[] [more]

Anisembiidae

Anisembiidae is a family of web-spinners in the order Embioptera. [more]

Anisitsiellidae

[more]

Anisoceratidae

[more]

Anisocyclidae

[more]

Anisogammaridae

Anisogammaridae is a family of small benthic amphipods. [more]

Anisograptidae

[more]

Anisolabididae

[more]

Anisopodidae

Anisopodidae is a small cosmopolitan family of gnat-like flies known as wood gnats or window-gnats with 154 described extant species in 15 genera, and several described fossil taxa. Some species are saprophagous or fungivorous. They are mostly small to medium-sized flies, except the genera Olbiogaster and Lobogaster, which are large with bizarrely spatulate abdomens. Their phylogenetic placement is controversial. They have been proposed to be the sister group to the higher flies, the Brachycera. Some authors consider this group to be four distinct families ? Anisopodidae, , Olbiogastridae, and Valeseguyidae. [more]

Ankylosauridae

[more]

Annelida

The annelids (also called "ringed worms"), formally called Annelida (from French annel?s "ringed ones", ultimately from Latin anellus "little ring"), are a large phylum of segmented worms, with over 17,000 modern species including ragworms, earthworms and leeches. They are found in marine environments from tidal zones to hydrothermal vents, in freshwater, and in moist terrestrial environments. Although most textbooks still use the traditional division into polychaetes (almost all marine), oligochaetes (which include earthworms) and leech-like species, research since 1997 has radically changed this scheme, viewing leeches as a sub-group of oligochaetes and oligochaetes as a sub-group of polychaetes. In addition, the Pogonophora, Echiura and Sipuncula, previously regarded as separate phyla, are now regarded as sub-groups of polychaetes. Annelids are considered members of the Lophotrochozoa, a "super-phylum" of protostomes that also includes molluscs, brachiopods, flatworms and nemerteans. [more]

Anniellidae

The family Anniellidae, known as American legless lizards contains two species in a single genus Anniella: A. pulchra, the California Legless Lizard, and the rare, A. geronimensis, Baja California Legless Lizard. [more]

Annulariidae

The family Pomatiidae is a taxonomic family of small operculate land snails, terrestrial gastropod mollusks that can be found over the warmer parts of the Old World. In the older literature, this family is designated as Pomatiasidae. [more]

Anobiidae

Anobiidae is a family of beetles. The larvae of a number of species tend to bore into wood, earning them the name "woodworm" or "wood borer". A few species are pests, causing damage to wooden furniture and house structures, notably the death watch beetle, Xestobium rufovillosum, and the common furniture beetle, Anobium punctatum. [more]

Anomalepidae

[more]

Anomalepididae

The Anomalepididae are a family of nonvenomous snakes found in Central and South America. They are similar to Typhlopidae, except that some species possess a single tooth in the lower jaw. Currently, 4 genera and 15 species are recognized. [more]

Anomalifrontidae

[more]

Anomalomyidae

[more]

Anomalopheidae

[more]

Anomalophiidae

[more]

Anomalopidae

The flashlight fish are a family, the Anomalopidae, of beryciform fish. There are some unrelated fish with similar features, some of which are also called flashlight fish. Notable among these are the deep sea lanternfish, of the family Myctophidae, of which there are over 200 species. [more]

Anomalopsychidae

[more]

Anomalorthidae

[more]

Anomaluridae

Anomaluridae is a family of rodents found in central Africa. They are known as anomalures or scaly-tailed squirrels. There are seven extant species, classified into three genera. Most are brightly colored. [more]

Anomiidae

[more]

Anomocaridae

[more]

Anomochilidae

The Anomochilidae, or anomochilids, are a monotypic family created for the genus Anomochilus, which currently contains 3 monotypic species. [more]

Anomoeotidae

[more]

Anomoepodidae

[more]

Anomopterellidae

[more]

Anomosetidae

Anomoses hylecoetes is a species of primitive hepialoid moth endemic to Queensland and New South Wales, Australia . It is the only species in the family Anomosetidae. [more]

Anomphalidae

[more]

Anonymidae

[more]

Anopliidae

[more]

Anoplocephalidae

[more]

Anoplogasteridae

Fangtooths are beryciform fish of the family Anoplogastridae (sometimes spelled "Anoplogasteridae") that live in the deep sea. The name is from Greek anoplo meaning "unarmed" and gaster meaning "stomach". With a circumglobal distribution in tropical and cold-temperate waters, the family contains only two very similar species, in one genus, with no known close relatives: the common fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta, found worldwide; and the shorthorned fangtooth, Anoplogaster brachycera, found in the tropical waters of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. [more]

Anoplogastridae

Fangtooths are beryciform fish of the family Anoplogastridae (sometimes spelled "Anoplogasteridae") that live in the deep sea. The name is from Greek anoplo meaning "unarmed" and gaster meaning "stomach". With a circumglobal distribution in tropical and cold-temperate waters, the family contains only two very similar species, in one genus, with no known close relatives: the common fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta, found worldwide; and the shorthorned fangtooth, Anoplogaster brachycera, found in the tropical waters of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. [more]

Anoplopomatidae

The sablefishes are a family, Anoplopomatidae, of scorpaeniform fishes. They are found in coastal waters of the north Pacific from Japan to California, where they live near the sea floor in deep water: the sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, has been found down to 1,830 metres (6,000 ft). They are large fish, with the skilfish being up to 180 centimetres (5.9 ft) in length. They are commercially important fishes, and are often given the market name blackcod. [more]

Anoplostomatidae

[more]

Anoplothecidae

[more]

Anoplotheriidae

[more]

Anopsobiidae

[more]

Anoptychiidae

?Anoptychiidae is an extinct taxonomic family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the informal group Lower Heterobranchia. [more]

Anostomidae

The Anostomidae are a family of ray-finned fishes that belong to the order Characiformes. Closely related to the Chilodontidae and formerly included with them, the Anostomidae contain over 140 described species. Commonly known as anostomids, they are found in freshwater habitats from the R?o Atrato in northernmost South America to warm-temperate central Argentina; they are of Amazonian origin, with few found west of the Andes (mainly in Colombia and Venezuela). Their scientific name approximately means "mouth on top", from Ancient Greek ?no- (???) "up" (as an adverb) + st?ma (st???) "mouth", in reference to the arrangement of these fishes' mouth opening. [more]

Anostostomatidae

Anostostomatidae is a family in the order Orthoptera. It is sometimes referred to as Mimnermidae or Henicidae in some taxonomies, and common names include King crickets in South Africa, and wetas in New Zealand. They are believed to be most closely related to the Jerusalem crickets of North America. Prominent members includes the Parktown prawn of South Africa, and the giant wetas of New Zealand. The cave wetas belong to another family, the Rhaphidophoridae. Their distribution reflects a common ancestry before the fragmenting of Gondwanaland. [more]

Anotopteridae

The daggertooths (genus Anotopterus) are a genus of aulopiform fish, the sole genus of the family Anotopteridae. They are found in oceans worldwide, but prefer cooler waters. [more]

Anozygidae

?Anozygidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Caenogastropoda. [more]

Anseranatidae

Anseranatidae, the magpie-geese, is a biological family of waterbirds. It is a unique member of the order Anseriformes. The only living species, the Magpie Goose, is a resident breeder in northern Australia and in southern New Guinea. [more]

Ansorgiidae

[more]

Antarcturidae

[more]

Antedonidae

Antedonidae is a family of crinoids or feather stars in the phylum Echinodermata. Members of the family are unstalked and have ten feathery arms. They can move about freely and have clawed cirri to attach them temporarily to structures. [more]

Antefungivoridae

[more]

Antennariidae

Frogfishes, family Antennariidae, are a type of anglerfish in the order Lophiiformes. They are known as anglerfishes in Australia, where 'frogfish' refers to a different type of fish. Frogfishes are found in almost all tropical and subtropical oceans and seas around the world, the primary exception being the Mediterranean Sea. [more]

Antennophoridae

Antennophoridae is a family of mites in the order Mesostigmata. [more]

Anteosauridae

The Anteosauridae or Anteosaurinae are a family (e.g. Boonstra 1963, 1969, Carroll 1988) or subfamily (e.g. Hopson & Barghusen 1986, King 1988) of very large carnivorous Dinocephalia (Anteosaurs) that are known from the Middle Permian of Russia (Doliosauriscus, Titanophoneus) and South Africa (Anteosaurus). The Russian genera were previously included by Efremov in the Brithopodidae. [more]

Antezeilleridae

[more]

Anthaspidellidae

[more]

Anthelidae

Anthelidae is a family of Australian lappet moths in the Lepidoptera order. It was previously included in the Lasiocampoidea superfamily, but a recent study resulted in reincluding the family in the superfamily Bombycoidea. [more]

Antheluridae

[more]

Anthemiphylliidae

[more]

Anthessiidae

Poecilostomatoida are an order of copepods previously included in the Cyclopoida. [more]

Anthicidae

Anthicidae is a family of beetles, sometimes called ant-like flower beetles or ant-like beetles that resemble ants. The family consists of over 3,000 species in about 100 genera. [more]

Anthocoridae

The Anthocoridae are a family of bugs, commonly called minute pirate bugs or flower bugs. [more]

Anthomyiidae

Anthomyiidae is a large and diverse family of Muscoidea flies. Most look rather like small houseflies, but are commonly drab grey. The genus Anthomyia, in contrast, are generally conspicuously-patterned in black-and-white or black-and-silvery-grey. Most are difficult to identify, apart from a few groups such as the kelp flies that are conspicuous on beaches. [more]

Anthomyzidae

[more]

Anthophoridae

The Apidae are a large family of bees, comprising the common honey bees, stingless bees (which are also cultured for honey), carpenter bees, orchid bees, cuckoo bees, bumblebees, and various other less well-known groups. The family Apidae presently includes all the genera that were previously classified in the families Anthophoridae and Ctenoplectridae, and most of these are solitary species, though a few are also cleptoparasites. The four groups that were subfamilies in the old family Apidae are presently ranked as tribes within the subfamily Apinae. This trend has been taken to its extreme in a few recent classifications that place all the existing bee families together under the name "Apidae" (or, alternatively, the non-Linnaean clade "Anthophila"), but this is not a widely-accepted practice. [more]

Anthoptilidae

[more]

Anthothelidae

Scleraxonia is a suborder of corals, a member of the phylum Cnidaria [more]

Anthozoa

[more]

Anthracobunidae

[more]

Anthracocarididae

[more]

Anthracoceratidae

[more]

Anthracopupidae

?Anthracopupidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Caenogastropoda. [more]

Anthracotheriidae

[more]

Anthribidae

Anthribidae is a family of beetles also known as fungus weevils. The antennae are not elbowed, may occasionally be longer than the body and thread-like, and can be the longest of any members of Curculionoidea. As in the Nemonychidae, the labrum appears as a separate segment to the clypeus, and the maxillary palps are long and projecting. [more]

Anthroleucosomatidae

[more]

Anthuridae

[more]

Anticomidae

[more]

Antigomonidae

[more]

Antigonariidae

Antigonariidae is a family of flatworms containing a single species in a single genus. [more]

Antilocapridae

Antilocapridae is a family of artiodactyls endemic to North America. Their closest extant relatives are the giraffids. Only one species, the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), is living today; all other members of the family are extinct. The living pronghorn is a small ruminant mammal resembling an antelope. It bears small, forked horns. [more]

Antipathidae

[more]

Antipatidae

[more]

Antipleuridae

[more]

Antipodoeciidae

[more]

Antonbruuniidae

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Antrodiaetidae

The folding trapdoor spiders (Antrodiaetidae) are a small spider family with about 30 species in three genera. They are related to the Atypidae (atypical tarantulas). [more]

Antroposthiidae

Antroposthiidae is a family of acoelomorph worms, containing three genera and four species: [more]

Anurognathidae

The Anurognathidae were a group of small pterosaurs, with short tails or tailless, that lived in Europe and Asia during the Jurassic and early Cretaceous periods. Four genera are known: Anurognathus, from the Late Jurassic of Germany, Jeholopterus, from the Middle or Late Jurassic of China, Dendrorhynchoides, from the Early Cretaceous of China, and Batrachognathus, from the Late Jurassic of Kazakhstan. Bennett (2007) claimed that the holotype of Mesadactylus, BYU 2024, a synsacrum, belonged to an Anurognathid. Mesadactylus is from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation of the USA. Indeterminate Anurognathid remains have also been reported from the Middle Jurassic Bakhar Svita of Mongolia. [more]

Anuropidae

[more]

Anuropodidae

[more]

Anyphaenidae

The anyphaenid sac spiders (family Anyphaenidae) are distinguished from the sac spiders and other spiders by having the abdominal spiracle placed one third to one half of the way anterior to the spinnerets toward the epigastric furrow on the underside of the abdomen. In most spiders the spiracle is just anterior to the spinnerets. Like clubionids, anyphaenids have eight eyes arranged in two rows, conical anterior spinnerets and are wandering predators that built silken retreats, or sacs, usually on plant terminals, between leaves, under bark or under rocks. There are more than 500 species in over 50 genera worldwide. [more]

Anystidae

[more]

Aoridae

[more]

Aotidae

The night monkeys, also known as the owl monkeys or douroucoulis, are the members of the genus Aotus of New World monkeys (monotypic in family Aotidae). They are widely distributed in the forests of Central and South America, from Panama south to Paraguay and northern Argentina. The species that live at higher elevations tend to have thicker fur than the monkeys at sea level. The genus name means "earless"; they have ears, of course, but the external ears are tiny and hard to see. Night monkeys have big brown eyes and therefore have increased ability to be active at night. They are called night monkeys because all species are active at night and are in fact the only truly nocturnal monkeys (an exception is the subspecies , which is cathemeral). Both male and female night monkeys weigh almost the same amount. For example, in one of these Night Monkeys, A. azarae, the male weighs 2.76 pounds while the female weighs 2.75 pounds. [more]

Apachyidae

Apachyidae is a small family of earwigs, in the suborder Forficulina and the order Dermaptera. It is one of nine families in the suborder Forficulina, and contains two genera (placed in one subfamily, Apachyinae). It has been cited by in his book, The Animal Kingdom, by Brindle in The Dermaptera of Africa, and by at least two others. [more]

Apataniidae

[more]

Apatelodidae

Apatelodidae is a somewhat disputed[] family of insects in the order Lepidoptera. They belong to the hawkoth, silkworm and relatives superfamily Bombycoidea. [more]

Apatemyidae

[more]

Apatopygidae

[more]

Aphalaridae

[more]

Aphanhysteridae

[more]

Aphanipathidae

[more]

Aphanostomidae

[more]

Aphelacaridae

[more]

Aphelenchidae

[more]

Aphelenchoididae

[more]

Aphelidesmidae

[more]

Aphelinidae

Aphelinidae is a moderate-sized family of tiny parasitic wasps, with some 1160 described species in some 35 genera. These minute insects are challenging to study as they deteriorate rapidly after death unless extreme care is taken (e.g., preservation in ethanol), making identification of most museum specimens difficult. The larvae of the majority are primary parasitoids on Hemiptera, though other hosts are attacked, and details of the life history can be variable (e.g., some attack eggs, some attack pupae, and others are hyperparasites). They are found throughout the world in virtually all habitats, and are extremely important as biological control agents. [more]

Aphelocheiridae

[more]

Apheviderulicidae

[more]

Aphididae

[more]

Aphidiidae

[more]

Aphilodontidae

[more]

Aphodiidae

[more]

Aphredoderidae

The pirate perch, Aphredoderus sayanus, is a freshwater fish of the Percopsiformes order. This small fish is native to the eastern half of North America. It is dark brown, sometimes with a darker band near the base tail. A unique feature of this fish is the forward placement of its cloaca, under the head, anterior to the pelvic fins. This placement allows the females to place their eggs more precisely into root masses. [more]

Aphrocallistidae

[more]

Aphrodidae

[more]

Aphroditidae

[more]

Aphroditinae

[more]

Aphrophoridae

[more]

Aphrosalpingidae

[more]

Aphylidae

[more]

Aphyonidae

Aphyonidae is a family of eel-like fishes in the order Ophidiiformes. They are found in tropical and subtropical waters throughout the world. They are deep-sea fishes, living between 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) and 6,000 metres (20,000 ft) depth. [more]

Apidae

The Apidae are a large family of bees, comprising the common honey bees, stingless bees (which are also cultured for honey), carpenter bees, orchid bees, cuckoo bees, bumblebees, and various other less well-known groups. The family Apidae presently includes all the genera that were previously classified in the families Anthophoridae and Ctenoplectridae, and most of these are solitary species, though a few are also cleptoparasites. The four groups that were subfamilies in the old family Apidae are presently ranked as tribes within the subfamily Apinae. This trend has been taken to its extreme in a few recent classifications that place all the existing bee families together under the name "Apidae" (or, alternatively, the non-Linnaean clade "Anthophila"), but this is not a widely-accepted practice. [more]

Apidioplanidae

[more]

Apioceridae

The Apioceridae, or flower-loving flies, are a small (approximately 150 species) family of flies, all in the single genus Apiocera. They occur mostly in dry sandy habitats in the deserts of North America, South America, and Australia. Other genera formerly placed in Apioceridae are now in Mydidae. [more]

Apiocrinitidae

[more]

Apiomorphidae

[more]

Apionacaridae

[more]

Apionidae

[more]

Apistidae

[more]

Apistobranchidae

[more]

Aplacophora

[more]

Aploactinidae

Little velvetfishes or simply velvetfishes are a family, the Aploactinidae, of scorpaeniform fishes. [more]

Aplocheilidae

Aplocheilidae are a family of bony fishes containing about 15 species. Formerly, the name "Aplocheilidae" was used for the as a whole, i.e. including the Nothobranchiidae of Africa and the mainly South American Rivulidae as subfamilies. This obsolete system is sometimes still seen, e.g. in ITIS. [more]

Aplodactylidae

Marblefishes are a family, Aplodactylidae, of perciform fishes. They are native to southern Australia, New Zealand, Peru and Chile. [more]

Aplodontidae

[more]

Aplodontiidae

[more]

Aplustridae

The Aplustridae is a taxonomic family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the informal group Lower Heterobranchia. [more]

Aplysellidae

[more]

Aplysiidae

The superfamily Aplysioidea is a superfamily of mostly rather large sea slugs, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Aplysiomorpha within the informal group Opisthobranchia. [more]

Aplysinellidae

[more]

Aplysinidae

[more]

Apodidae

The swifts are a family, Apodidae, of highly aerial birds. They are superficially similar to swallows, but are actually not closely related to passerine species at all; swifts are in the separate order Apodiformes, which they share with hummingbirds. The treeswifts are closely related to the true swifts, but form a separate family, the Hemiprocnidae. [more]

Apogonidae

Cardinalfishes are a family, Apogonidae, of ray-finned fishes. They are found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans, they are chiefly marine, but some species are found in brackish water. A handful of species are kept in the aquarium and are popular as small, peaceful, and colorful fish. [more]

Apolemidae

[more]

Apolemiidae

[more]

Aponchiidae

[more]

Apoprogonidae

Apoprogoninae is a subfamily of the moth family Sematuridae, represented by a single species from Swaziland, South Africa. [more]

Aporcelaimidae

[more]

Aporometridae

[more]

Apororhynchidae

Apororhynchida is an order containing one family, Apororhynchidae, and one genus, Apororhynchus, of microscopic parasitic worms that attach themselves to the intestinal wall of terrestrial vertebrates. [more]

Aporrhaidae

[more]

Aporrhaididae

[more]

Aporrhaiidae

[more]

Aproctidae

[more]

Aprosphylosomatidae

[more]

Apseudellidae

[more]

Apseudidae

[more]

Apsidoceratidae

[more]

Apsilocephalidae

Apsilocephalidae is a family of flies in the superfamily Asiloidea. The family was proposed in 1991. [more]

Apternodontidae

[more]

Apteronotidae

The ghost knifefishes are a family, Apteronotidae, of ray-finned fishes in the order Gymnotiformes. These fish can be found in the freshwater of Panama and South America. [more]

Apteropanorpidae

Apteropanorpidae is a family of wingless scorpionflies containing a single genus Apteropanorpa with four named species. These species, also called Tasmanian snow scorpionflies are found in moss in Tasmania and southern Australia. The adults are generalised predators. The larvae live in moss and are locally common. [more]

Apterouridae

[more]

Apterygidae

Kiwi are flightless birds endemic to New Zealand, in the genus Apteryx and family Apterygidae. [more]

Aptornithidae

The adzebills, genus Aptornis, were two closely related bird species, the North Island Adzebill, Aptornis otidiformis, and the South Island Adzebill, Aptornis defossor, of the extinct family Aptornithidae. The family was endemic to New Zealand. [more]

Apystomyiidae

Apystomyiidae are a family of flies. They are placed in the superfamily Asiloidea. There is only one genus which contains a single species. [more]

Aracanidae

The Aracanidae are a family of bony fishes related to the boxfishes. They are somewhat more primitive than the true boxfishes, but have a similar protective covering of thickened scale plates. They are found in the Indian Ocean and the west Pacific. Unlike the true boxfishes, they inhabit deep waters, of over 200 metres (660 ft) in depth. [more]

Arachnactidae

[more]

Arachnidiidae

[more]

Arachnoididae

[more]

Arachnopusiidae

The Arachnopusiidae is a family within the bryozoan order Cheilostomata. [more]

Aradidae

Aradidae bear the appropriate common name, flat bugs, in reference to their (usually) extremely flattened body. With few exceptions, the often cryptic insects are of no economic importance. Common temperate genera include Aradus, , Neuroctenus, and Aneurus. [more]

Araeolaimidae

[more]

Araeoscelididae

[more]

Araksalosiidae

[more]

Arambourgellidae

[more]

Aramidae

[more]

Araneidae

The "typical" orb-weaver spiders (family Araneidae) are the most common group of builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields and forests. Their common name is taken from the round shape of this typical web, and the taxon was formerly also referred to as the Orbiculariae. [more]

Aranucidae

Aranucidae is a family of sea slugs, nudibranchs, marine gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Tritonioidea. [more]

Arapaimidae

[more]

Araripelocustidae

[more]

Araripichthyidae

[more]

Araxoceratidae

[more]

Arbaciidae

The Arbacioida are an order of sea urchins, consisting of a single family, the Arbaciidae. They are distinguished from other sea urchins by the presence of five separate plates around the anus. Unlike their close relatives, the Salenioida, all of the tubercles on their test are of similar size. It contains the following genera: [more]

Arborichthoniidae

[more]

Arceremaeidae

[more]

Arcestidae

[more]

Archaeaspidae

[more]

Archaeidae

The Archaeidae are a spider family with 25 described species in three genera. [more]

Archaemiopteridae

[more]

Archaeobalanidae

Archaeobalanidae is a family of barnacles of the order Sessilia. [more]

Archaeocidaridae

[more]

Archaeocumidae

[more]

Archaeocyathidae

[more]

Archaeocynipidae

[more]

Archaeohyracidae

[more]

Archaeolemuridae

The Monkey lemurs or Baboon lemurs are an extinct type of lemurs that includes one family, Archaeolemuridae, two genera (Hadropithecus and Archaeolemur) and three species. Despite their common names, members of Archaeolemuridae were not as closely related to monkeys as they were to other lemurs. [more]

Archaeonycteridae

Archaeonycteridae (formerly spelled Archaeonycterididae) is a family of extinct bats. It was originally erected by the Swiss naturalist Pierre Revilliod as Archaeonycterididae to hold the genus Archaeonycteris. It was formerly classified under the superfamily Icaronycteroidea (disused) by Kurten and Anderson in 1980. In 2007, the spelling was corrected to Archaeonycteridae and it was reclassified to the unranked clade by Smith et al.. The family Palaeochiropterygidae was also merged into Archaeonycteridae by Kurten and Anderson, but modern authorities specializing in bat fossils maintain the distinction between the two. [more]

Archaeonycterididae

[more]

Archaeophiidae

[more]

Archaeopithecidae

Archaeopithecidae is an extinct family comprising two genera of notoungulate mammals, and Archaeopithecus, both known from the early Eocene of South America (McKenna and Bell, 1997). [more]

Archaeopragidae

?Archaeopragidae is an extinct family of paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position (Gastropoda or Monoplacophora). [more]

Archaeopterygidae

[more]

Archaeorchestidae

[more]

Archaeoschyphiidae

[more]

Archaeoscinidae

[more]

Archaeotrogonidae

[more]

Archasteridae

[more]

Archechiniscidae

[more]

Archegosauridae

[more]

Archeocrypticidae

[more]

Archeonothridae

[more]

Archeriidae

[more]

Archescytinidae

[more]

Archiconiopterygidae

[more]

Archidesmidae

[more]

Archidorididae

[more]

Archinacellidae

?Archinacellidae is an extinct family of paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position (Gastropoda or Monoplacophora). [more]

Archinomidae

[more]

Archinotodelphyidae

[more]

Archipsocidae

Archipsocidae is a family of Psocoptera belonging to the suborder Psocomorpha. Members of the family are characterised by their reduced wing venation. Some species are viviparous. The family includes about 80 species in five genera. [more]

Archirhizidae

[more]

Archisargidae

[more]

Architectonicidae

Architectonicidae, common name the staircase shells or sundials, are a family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the informal group "Lower Heterobranchia" (= Allogastropoda) of the clade Heterobranchia. [more]

Architeuthidae

The giant squid (genus: Architeuthis) is a deep-ocean dwelling squid in the family Architeuthidae, represented by as many as eight species. Giant squid can grow to a tremendous size (see Deep-sea gigantism): recent estimates put the maximum size at 13 metres (43 ft) for females and 10 metres (33 ft) for males from caudal fin to the tip of the two long tentacles (second only to the colossal squid at an estimated 14 metres (46 ft), one of the largest living organisms). The mantle is about 2 metres (6.6 ft) long (more for females, less for males), and the length of the squid excluding its tentacles is about 5 metres (16 ft). There have been claims of specimens measuring 20 metres (66 ft) or more, but no giant squid of such size has been scientifically documented. [more]

Archithemistidae

[more]

Archizelmiridae

[more]

Archoglossopteridae

[more]

Arcidae

Ark clam is the common name for a family of small to large-sized saltwater clams or marine bivalve molluscs in the family Arcidae. Ark clams vary both in shape and size. They number about 200 species worldwide. [more]

Arcovestiidae

[more]

Arctacaridae

[more]

Arcticidae

Arcticidae is a family of bivalve molluscs in the order Veneroida. [more]

Arctiidae

Arctiidae is a large and diverse family of moths with around 11,000 species found all over the world, including 6,000 neotropical species. This family includes the groups commonly known as tiger moths (or tigers), which usually have bright colors, footmen (which are usually much drabber), lichen moths and wasp moths. Many species have 'hairy' caterpillars which are popularly known as woolly bears or woolly worms. The scientific name refers to this (Gk. a??t?? = a bear). Caterpillars may also go by the name 'tussock moths' (more usually this refers to Lymantriidae, however). [more]

Arctocyonidae

Arctocyonidae (from Greek arktos ky?n, "bear/dog-like") is an extinct family of unspecialized, primitive mammals with more than 20 genera most abundant during the Paleocene, but extant from the late Cretaceous to the early Eocene (65.5 to 50 million years ago). These animals are thought to be the ancestors of the orders Mesonychia and Cetartiodactyla. [more]

Arctohedridae

[more]

Arctostylopidae

[more]

Arcturidae

[more]

Arcturididae

[more]

Ardeidae

The herons are long-legged freshwater and coastal birds in the family Ardeidae. There are 64 recognised species in this family. Some are called "egrets" or "bitterns" instead of "heron". [more]

Ardeosauridae

[more]

Arenicolidae

Arenicolidae is a family of marine polychaete worms. They are commonly known as lugworms and the little coils of sand they produce are commonly seen on the beach. Arenicolids are found worldwide, mostly living in burrows in sandy substrates. Most are deposit feeders but some graze on algae. [more]

Arenohydracaridae

[more]

Areobiotrematidae

[more]

Areoscelidae

[more]

Areostrophiidae

[more]

Areozetidae

[more]

Argasidae

Argasidae is a family of ticks containing the soft ticks. They lack the hard scutum that is present in the hard ticks (Ixodidae). The capitulum (mouthparts-bearing structure) is located on the underside of the animal's body and is not readily visible. The family contains 193 species, although the composition of the genera is less certain, and more study is needed before the genera can become stable. The currently accepted genera are Antricola, Argas, , Ornithodoros and Otobius. [more]

Argentinidae

The herring smelts or argentines are a family, Argentinidae, of marine smelts. They are similar in appearance to smelts (family Osmeridae) but have much smaller mouths. [more]

Argestidae

[more]

Argidae

Argidae is a large family of sawflies, containing some 800 species worldwide, primarily in tropical regions. The larvae are phytophagous, and commonly can be found feeding (and often pupating) in groups, though very few attain pest status. [more]

Arginbaataridae

[more]

Argiopidae

[more]

Argissidae

[more]

Argnidae

Argnidae is a family of air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks. [more]

Argonautidae

Argonautidae is a family of cephalopods encompassing the modern paper nautiluses of the genus Argonauta along with several extinct genera of shelled octopods. [more]

Arguimuridae

[more]

Arguitheriidae

[more]

Argulidae

The family Argulidae contains the carp lice or fish lice ? a group of parasitic crustaceans of uncertain position within the Maxillopoda. Although they are thought to be forms, they have no fossil record. Argulidae is the only family in the order Arguloida (occasionally "Arguloidea"), although a second family, Dipteropeltidae, has been proposed. [more]

Argyresthiidae

Argyresthiinae is a subfamily of moths of the Yponomeutidae family, although it is treated as a valid family Argyresthiidae by some authors. [more]

Argyrolagidae

[more]

Arhynchobatidae

Skates are cartilaginous fish belonging to the family Rajidae in the superorder Batoidea of rays. There are more than 200 described species in 27 genera. There are two subfamilies, Rajinae (hardnose skates) and Arhynchobatinae (softnose skates). [more]

Arhythmacanthidae

Arhythmacanthidae are a family of parasitic worms from the order Echinorhynchida. [more]

Aribatidae

[more]

Arietellidae

[more]

Arietitidae

Arietitidae is a family of true ammonites that make up part of the superfamily Psilocerataceae. They comprise medium-size to large or gigantic genera which in general are strongly ribbed, tuberculate in some, with keeled or grooved and keeled venters, and well differentiated ammonitic sutures. The aptycus is single valved with a shiny, concentrically striated surface. [more]

Ariidae

The Ariidae or ariid catfish are a family of catfish that mainly live in marine waters with many freshwater and brackish water species. They are found worldwide in tropical to warm temperate zones. [more]

Ariolimacidae

Ariommatidae

Ariommatidae is a family of perciform fishes. The family contains a single genus Ariomma. [more]

Ariommidae

[more]

Arionidae

[more]

Ariophantidae

Ariophantidae is a taxonomic family of air-breathing land snails and semi-slugs, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Helicarionoidea (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Aristeidae

[more]

Aristiidae

[more]

Aristocystitidae

[more]

Arixeniidae

[more]

Armadillidae

[more]

Armadillidiidae

Armadillidiidae is a family of woodlice, a terrestrial crustacean group in the order Isopoda. Unlike members of other woodlouse families, members of this family can roll into a ball, an ability they share with the outwardly similar but unrelated pill millipedes and other animals. It is this ability which gives woodlice in this family their common name of pill bugs, roly polies or potato bugs. The best known species in the family is Armadillidium vulgare, the common pill bug. [more]

Armaniidae

[more]

Armaueriidae

[more]

Armenoceratidae

[more]

Armilliferidae

[more]

Arminidae

Arminidae is a family of sea slugs, marine gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Arminoidea. [more]

Armintomyidae

[more]

Armorhydridae

[more]

Arnolidae

[more]

Aromobatidae

[more]

Arpaditidae

[more]

Arrenuridae

[more]

Arrhenophanidae

Arrhenophanidae is a family of moths in the Lepidoptera order. [more]

Arrhopalitidae

[more]

Arriidae

[more]

Arripidae

Australian Salmon, (known as 'Kahawai' in New Zealand), are medium-sized perciform marine fish of the small family Arripidae (sometimes incorrectly spelled Arripididae). Four species are recognized, all within the genus Arripis. Despite the common name, Australian Salmon are not related to the salmon (Salmonidae) of the Northern Hemisphere; the former were named so by early European settlers after their superficial resemblance to the salmoniform fishes. [more]

Arsinoitheriidae

[more]

Artedidraconidae

Artedidraconidae is a family of marine perciform fishes comprising four genera. Artedidraconidae are endemic to deep waters off Antarctica. The operculum carries a hook-shaped spine and there are four or five . Artedidraconidae have 33 to 41 vertebrae. The name "Artedidraconidae" is derived from a combination of Artedi (from Peter Artedi, the "father of ichthyology") and the Greek drakon (d?????, dragon). A mental barbel is a characteristic of this family; the morphology of this barbel is variable with the species. Species of Artedidraconidae are said to have speciated sympatrically. [more]

Artematopidae

[more]

Artemiidae

Artemia is a genus of aquatic crustaceans known as brine shrimp. Artemia, the only genus in the family Artemiidae, has changed little externally since the Triassic period. The historical record of the existence of Artemia dates back to 982 from Urmia Lake, Iran, although the first unambiguous record are the report and drawings made by Schl?sser in 1756 of animals from Lymington, England. Artemia populations are found worldwide in inland saltwater lakes, but not in oceans. Artemia are able to avoid cohabitating with most types of predators, such as fish, by their ability to live in waters of very high salinity up to 250?. [more]

Artesiidae

[more]

Arthroleptidae

Arthroleptidae () is a family of frogs found in Sub-Saharan Africa. They are also known as squeakers because of their high-pitched call. They are small, less than 4 centimetres (1.6 in) in length, terrestrial frogs found mostly in leaf litter on the forest floor. They completely bypass any aquatic stage, and therefore do not have tadpoles. They lay their eggs on the ground, in crevices or in leaf litter, and the offspring undergo direct development. Some species hatch already completely metamorphosed into the adult form, while others still have tails when they hatch. [more]

Arthropleidae

[more]

Arthropoda

An arthropod is an invertebrate animal having an exoskeleton (external skeleton), a segmented body, and jointed appendages. Arthropods are members of the phylum Arthropoda (from Greek ?rthron, "joint", and p?d?? pod?s "foot", which together mean "jointed feet"), and include the insects, arachnids, crustaceans, and others. Arthropods are characterized by their jointed limbs and cuticles, which are mainly made of a-chitin; the cuticles of crustaceans are also biomineralized with calcium carbonate. The rigid cuticle inhibits growth, so arthropods replace it periodically by molting. The arthropod body plan consists of repeated segments, each with a pair of appendages. It is so versatile that they have been compared to Swiss Army knives, and it has enabled them to become the most species-rich members of all ecological guilds in most environments. They have over a million described species, making up more than 80% of all described living animal species, and are one of only two animal groups that are very successful in dry environments ? the other being the amniotes. They range in size from microscopic plankton up to forms a few meters long. [more]

Artotrogidae

[more]

Artzosuchidae

[more]

Asaphidae

Asaphidae is a family of trilobites in the order Asaphida, containing the following genera: [more]

Asaphiscidae

[more]

Asauridae

[more]

Ascalaphidae

Owlflies are dragonfly-like insects with large bulging eyes and long knobbed antennae. They are neuropterans in the family Ascalaphidae; they are only distantly related to the true flies, and even more distant from the dragonflies and damselflies. They are diurnal or crepuscular predators of other flying insects, and are typically 5 cm (2.0 in) long. [more]

Ascaphidae

The tailed frogs are two species of frogs. The species are part of the genus, Ascaphus is the only taxon in the family Ascaphidae (). The "tail" in the name is actually an extension of the male cloaca. The tail is one of two distinctive anatomical features adapting the species to life in fast-flowing streams. It is the only North American frog that reproduces by internal fertilization. [more]

Ascarididae

[more]

Ascaridiidae

Ascaridiidae is the name of a family of parasitic nematodes. The family includes roundworms belonging to a single genus Ascaridia. Members are essentially intestinal parasites of gallinaceous birds, including domestic fowl. A. galli is the most prevalent and pathogenic species, especially in domestic fowl. They cause the disease ascaridiasis in birds. [more]

Ascidae

Ascidae is a family of mites in the order Mesostigmata. [more]

Ascidicolidae

[more]

Ascidiidae

Ascidiidae ("same-sac family") is a family of tunicates in the class Ascidiacea. [more]

Ascoceratidae

[more]

Ascodictyidae

[more]

Ascomyzontidae

[more]

Ascopariidae

Ascopariidae is a family of flatworms. [more]

Ascothoracidae

[more]

Ascouracaridae

[more]

Asellidae

Asellidae is a family of isopod crustaceans. It is one of the largest families of freshwater isopods, living in both epigean and hypogean habitats in North America and Europe. The family includes the following genera: [more]

Aseptirhynchiidae

[more]

Asiatheriidae

[more]

Asilidae

Insects in the Diptera family Asilidae are commonly called robber flies. The family Asilidae contains about 7,100 described species worldwide. [more]

Asilomorpha

The Brachyceran infraorder Asilomorpha is a large and diverse group of flies, containing the bulk of the non-muscoid Brachycera. [more]

Asiochaoboridae

[more]

Asiocoleidae

[more]

Asiopsocidae

Asiopsocidae is a family of Psocoptera belonging to the infraorder Caeciliusetae. The family is composed of 14 known species in three genera. [more]

Asiopteridae

[more]

Aspidoceratidae

[more]

Aspidodiadematidae

Aspidodiadematidae is a family of sea urchins. [more]

Aspidogasteridae

[more]

Aspidogastridae

[more]

Aspidohymenidae

[more]

Aspidorhynchidae

[more]

Aspidosiphonidae

Aspidosiphonidae is a family of peanut worms. It is the only family in the Aspidosiphoniformes, which is in the class Phascolosomatidea. [more]

Aspidostomatidae

[more]

Aspidothoracidae

[more]

Asplanchnidae

[more]

Aspredinidae

The Aspredinidae are a small South American family of catfishes (order Siluriformes) also known as the banjo catfishes. [more]

Assamiidae

[more]

Assimineidae

Assimineidae is a family of minute snails with an operculum that live in saltwater, freshwater or on the land; they are mostly aquatic gastropod mollusks or micromollusks, in the clade Littorinimorpha. [more]

Astacidae

The family Astacidae comprises the freshwater crayfish native to Europe and western North America. It is made up of three genera. Pacifastacus is found on the Pacific coast of the United States and British Columbia and includes the signal crayfish and the Shasta crayfish. The genera Astacus and Austropotamobius are both found throughout Europe and parts of western Asia. [more]

Astacocrotonidae

Astartidae

Astartidae is a family of bivalves related to the family or venus clams. [more]

Astegistidae

[more]

Asteiidae

Asteiidae is a small but widespread family of acalyptrate flies or Diptera. About 130 species in 10 genera have been described worldwide.They are rarely collected. [more]

Asteriidae

Asteriidae is a family of Asteroidea (sea stars) in the order Forcipulatida. [more]

Asterinidae

Asterinidae is a large family of sea stars in the order Valvatida. It contains twenty-five genera. [more]

Asternoseiidae

Asternoseiidae is a family of mites in the order Mesostigmata. [more]

Asterocheridae

[more]

Asterodiscididae

[more]

Asterolecaniidae

Asterolecaniidae is a family of scale insects commonly known as pit scales or asterolecaniids. They typically cause a depression in the host plant's tissues and often cause distortion of the shoots. They are found on a range of hosts but are especially common on oaks, bamboos and a number of ornamental plants. Members of this family occur in most regions of the world but are most abundant in the northern hemisphere. There are about 27 genera and 243 recorded species. [more]

Asterometridae

[more]

Asteronotidae

[more]

Asteronychidae

[more]

Asteropidae

[more]

Asteropseidae

Asteropseidae is a family of sea stars. Members of the family have relatively broad discs and five short tapering arms. [more]

Asteroschematidae

[more]

Asterosteidae

[more]

Asterostomatidae

[more]

Asthenohymenidae

[more]

Astraeomorphidae

[more]

Astraeospongiidae

[more]

Astrapotheriidae

Astrapotheria is an extinct order of South American hoofed animals. The history of this order is enigmatic, but it may taxonomically belong to Meridiungulata (along with Notoungulata, Litopterna and Pyrotheria). In turn, Meridungulata is believed to belong to the extant superorder Laurasiatheria. However, some scientists regard the astrapotheres (and sometimes the Meridiungulata all together) to be members of the clade Atlantogenata. An example of this order is Astrapotherium magnum. When alive, Astrapotherium might have resembled a mastodon, but was only three meters (ten feet) long. [more]

Astraraeidae

[more]

Astraspidae

[more]

Astriclypeidae

[more]

Astroblepidae

Astroblepus is a genus of catfish (order Siluriformes) which contains 55 species. It is the sole genus in the family Astroblepidae, the most species-rich family in which there is a single genus. These fish are known as the naked sucker-mouth catfishes or the climbing catfishes. [more]

Astrocladiidae

[more]

Astrocoeniidae

Astrocoeniidae is a small family of stony corals. They are endemic to the waters around Papua New Guinea and northern Australia. [more]

Astrocrinidae

[more]

Astronesthidae

[more]

Astropectinidae

Astropectinidae is a family of sea stars in the order Paxillosida. There are ten genera in Astropectinidae. [more]

Astroscleridae

[more]

Astrospiculariidae

[more]

Astylospongiidae

[more]

Astylosternidae

Arthroleptidae () is a family of frogs found in Sub-Saharan Africa. They are also known as squeakers because of their high-pitched call. They are small, less than 4 centimetres (1.6 in) in length, terrestrial frogs found mostly in leaf litter on the forest floor. They completely bypass any aquatic stage, and therefore do not have tadpoles. They lay their eggs on the ground, in crevices or in leaf litter, and the offspring undergo direct development. Some species hatch already completely metamorphosed into the adult form, while others still have tails when they hatch. [more]

Astyridae

[more]

Asymmetronidae

The lancelets (from "lancet"), also known as amphioxi, comprise some 22 species of fish-like marine chordates with a global distribution in shallow temperate (as far north as Scotland) and tropical seas, usually found half-buried in sand. They are the modern representatives of the subphylum Cephalochordata, formerly thought to be the sister group of the craniates. In Asia, they are harvested commercially as food for humans and domesticated animals. They are an important object of study in zoology as they provide indications about the origins of the vertebrates. Lancelets serve as an intriguing comparison point for tracing how vertebrates have evolved and adapted. Although lancelets split from vertebrates more than 520 million years ago, their genomes hold clues about evolution, particularly how vertebrates have employed old genes for new functions. They are regarded as similar to the archetypal vertebrate form. [more]

Ataphridae

Ataphridae, common name the false top snails, is a family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Vetigastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Ataxioceratidae

[more]

Ataxophragmiidae

[more]

Ateleaspidae

[more]

Atelecrinidae

[more]

Atelecyclidae

Atelecyclidae is a family of crabs belonging to the Cancroidea superfamily, and currently containing eight genera two of which are extinct. However, the genera other than do not belong in the Cancroidea, and are to be removed from the family. [more]

Ateleopodidae

The jellynose fishes or tadpole fishes are the small order Ateleopodiformes. This group of ray-finned fish is monotypic, containing a single family Ateleopodidae. It has about one dozen species in four genera, but these enigmatic fishes are in need of taxonomic revision.  [more]

Atelestidae

Atelestidae is a family of true flies in the superfamily Empidoidea. These four genera were placed in a separate family in 1983. They were formerly either in Platypezidae (which are not even particularly closely related) or considered incertae cedis. But while they are doubtless the most basal of the living Empidoidea, the monophyly of the family is not fully proven. The genus seems to represent a most ancient lineage among the entire superfamily, while Meghyperus is probably not monophyletic in its present delimitation, and it is liable to be split up eventually, with some species being placed elsewhere. [more]

Atelidae

Atelidae is one of the five families of New World monkeys now recognised. It was formerly included in the family Cebidae. Atelids are generally larger monkeys; the family includes the howler, spider, woolly and woolly spider monkeys (the latter being the largest of the New World monkeys). They are found throughout the forested regions of Central and South America, from Mexico to northern Argentina. [more]

Ateluridae

Atelurinae is a subfamily of primitive insects belonging to the order Thysanura. They are sometimes treated as a family Ateluridae. These are tiny and usually found within the nests of termites and ants with which they associate. [more]

Atemnidae

[more]

Athericidae

Athericidae is a small family of flies known as water snipe-flies; they used to be placed in the family Rhagionidae. The adults mostly feed on nectar but some species feed on mammal blood. [more]

Atherinidae

The Old World silversides are a family, Atherinidae, of fish in the order Atheriniformes. They occur worldwide in tropical and temperate waters. About two thirds of the species are marine, and the remainder live in fresh water. [more]

Atherinopsidae

The neotropical silversides are a family Atherinopsidae of fish in the order Atheriniformes. The approximately 104 species in 13 genera are distributed throughout the tropical and temperate waters of the New World, including both marine and freshwater habitats. The familiar grunions and Atlantic silverside belong to this family. [more]

Atherionidae

[more]

Athienemanniidae

[more]

Athoracophoridae

Athoracophoridae, common name the leaf-veined slugs, are a family of air-breathing land slugs, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the infraorder Stylommatophora, the stalk-eyed snails and slugs. Many of the species have an attractive pattern on their dorsal surface which resembles the veins in a leaf, hence the common name. [more]

Athorybiidae

[more]

Athyreacaridae

[more]

Athyrididae

[more]

Athyrisinidae

[more]

Atlantasellidae

Atlantasellus is a genus of crustaceans, and the only member of the family Atlantasellidae. It contains the following species: [more]

Atlantidae

Atlantidae is a family of sea snails, holoplanktonic gastropod molluscs in the clade Littorinimorpha. [more]

Atollidae

Atolla is a genus of crown jellyfish which was proposed by Ernst Haeckel in 1880 and elevated to the family level by Henry Bigelow in 1913. The six known species inhabit mesopelagic zone. The medusae possess multiple (more than 16) lobes called lappets at the bell margin. The number of tentacles and rhopalia is twice as less as the number of lappets. [more]

Atopetholidae

[more]

Atopochthoniidae

[more]

Atopogestidae

[more]

Atopomelidae

[more]

Atoposauridae

[more]

Atorellidae

[more]

Atractaspididae

The Atractaspididae are a family of snakes found in Africa and the Middle East. Currently, 12 genera are recognized. [more]

Atractidae

[more]

Atriboniidae

[more]

Atrichornithidae

Scrub-birds are shy, secretive, ground-dwelling birds of the family Atrichornithidae. There are just two species. The Rufous scrub-bird is rare and very restricted in its range, and the Noisy scrub-bird is so rare that until 1961 it was thought to be extinct. Both are native to Australia. [more]

Atriplectididae

[more]

Atrochidae

[more]

Atrypidae

[more]

Atrypinidae

[more]

Atsabitidae

[more]

Attelabidae

The Attelabidae or leaf-rolling weevils are a widespread family of weevils. There are more than 2000 species. They are included within the primitive weevils, because of their straight antennae, which are inserted near the base of the rostrum. The prothorax is much narrower than the base of the elytra on the abdomen. [more]

Attemsiidae

[more]

Attevidae

[more]

Atubaridae

[more]

Aturidae

[more]

Atyidae

Atyidae is a family of shrimp, present in all tropical and most temperate waters of the world. Adults of this family are almost always confined to fresh water. This is the only family in the superfamily Atyoidea. [more]

Atylenchidae

[more]

Atypidae

The atypical tarantulas or purseweb spiders (family Atypidae) consist of only three genera. Purseweb spiders are accomplished ambush predators that spend most of their time in a sock-like, silken retreat on the ground from where they kill their prey. [more]

Auchenipteridae

The driftwood catfishes are catfishes of the family Auchenipteridae. [more]

Audyanidae

[more]

Audycoptidae

[more]

Auerbachiidae

[more]

Augaptilidae

Augaptilidae is a family of copepods, comprising the following genera: [more]

Auguritidae

[more]

Aulaceridae

[more]

Aulacidae

The family Aulacidae is a small cosmopolitan group, with 3 extant genera containing some 200 known species. They are primarily endoparasitoids of wood wasps (Xiphydriidae) and xylophagous beetles (Cerambycidae and Buprestidae). They are closely related to the family Gasteruptiidae, sharing the feature of having the first and second metasomal tergites fused, and having the head on a long pronotal "neck", though they are not nearly as slender and elongate as Gasteruptiids, nor are their hind legs club-like, and they have a more sculptured thorax. They share the evanioid trait of having the metasoma attached very high above the hind coxae on the propodeum. [more]

Aulacigastridae

Aulacigastridae is a very small family of flies known as sap flies. The family used to be included within this family, but was moved by Papp in 1984. [more]

Aulacoceratidae

[more]

Aulacopleuridae

[more]

Aulacostephanidae

[more]

Aulacothyropsidae

[more]

Aulastraeoporidae

[more]

Aulaxiniidae

[more]

Aulocalycidae

[more]

Aulocystidae

[more]

Aulolaimidae

[more]

Aulonocnemidae

[more]

Aulonotretidae

[more]

Aulopidae

The Aulopidae are a small family of aulopiform fish, containing the single genus Aulopus. They are found in most tropical and subtropical oceans, being absent only in the eastern Pacific and commonly known as flagfins. [more]

Aulopodidae

[more]

Auloporidae

[more]

Aulorhynchidae

The tube-snouts are a family, the Aulorhynchidae, of fish related to the sticklebacks. There are only two species in the family, each placed in its own genus. Both are found in shallow marine waters, with one living off the west coast of North America, and the other off the coast of Japan. [more]

Aulostegidae

[more]

Aulostomidae

The family Aulostomidae is a monogeneric family of highly specialized, tubularly-elongated marine fishes commonly known as trumpetfishes. Aulostomids belong to the order Syngnathiformes, along with the seahorses and the similarly built cornetfishes. There are three distinct species for the family's sole genus, Aulostomus. [more]

Aurelianidae

[more]

Aurelianiidae

[more]

Auriculospongiidae

[more]

Auridistomatidae

[more]

Auridistomidae

[more]

Auritamiidae

[more]

Austrachipteriidae

[more]

Australembiidae

[more]

Australimyzidae

[more]

Australochelidae

[more]

Australocytherideidae

[more]

Australomedusidae

[more]

Austramphilinidae

[more]

Austrarcturellidae

[more]

Austrirhynchiidae

[more]

Austrochilidae

The Austrochilidae are a small spider family with nine species in three genera. [more]

Austrocorduliidae

[more]

Austrocynipidae

[more]

Austrodecidae

Austrodecidae is a family of sea spiders. Austrodecids tend to be small measuring only 1-2 mm. This family is polyphyletic and will be split into two groups. [more]

Austrognathiidae

[more]

Austroleptidae

[more]

Austroniidae

[more]

Austroperlidae

[more]

Austropetaliidae

Austropetaliidae is a small family of dragonflies occurring only in Chile and Australia. [more]

Austrophasmatidae

[more]

Austrotriconodontidae

[more]

Autognetidae

[more]

Avenzoariidae

[more]

Aviculopectinidae

[more]

Aviellidae

[more]

Avimimidae

[more]

Avisauridae

[more]

Avoninidae

[more]

Axianassidae

[more]

Axiidae

Axiidae is a family of thalassinidean crustaceans. It includes the following genera : [more]

Axinellidae

Axinellidae is a family of sponges in the order Halichondrida. [more]

Axinidae

[more]

Axinolobidae

[more]

Axonolaimidae

[more]

Axonopsidae

[more]

Axophyllidae

[more]

Axosmiliidae

[more]

Axymyiidae

The Nematoceran family Axymyiidae is the sole member of the infraorder Axymyiomorpha, though it is often included within the infraorder Bibionomorpha in older classifications. It is known from only 6 species in 3 genera, plus 3 fossil species. [more]

Azecidae

[more]

Azhdarchidae

[more]

Azoricidae

[more]

Azygiidae

[more]

Babakinidae

Babakina is a genus of sea slug[ ]s, aeolid nudibranchs, marine gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Aeolidioidea. [more]

Babinkidae

[more]

Babinskaiidae

[more]

Babyloniidae

Babyloniidae is a taxonomic family of predatory sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks within the superfamily Muricoidea. [more]

Bachitheriidae

[more]

Bacillidae

[more]

Bacteriidae

[more]

Bactritidae

[more]

Bactryniidae

[more]

Baculitidae

Baculitidae is a family of extinct ammonoid cephalopods that lived mostly during the Late Cretaceous, and often included in the suborder Ancyloceratina. [more]

Badidae

[more]

Badiotitidae

[more]

Baenidae

[more]

Baeriidae

[more]

Baetidae

Baetidae is a family of mayflies with about 900 described species distributed worldwide. These are among the smallest of mayflies, adults rarely exceeding 10 mm in length excluding the two long slender tails and sometimes much smaller, and members of the family are often referred to as small mayflies or small minnow mayflies. Most species have long oval forewings with very few cross veins (see Comstock-Needham system) but the hindwings are usually very small or even absent. The males often have very large eyes, shaped like turrets above the head (this is known as "turbinate condition"). [more]

Baetiscidae

[more]

Bagridae

Bagridae are a family of catfish that originate from Africa and Asia from Japan to Borneo. These fish are commonly known as naked catfishes or bagrid catfishes. [more]

Baicalarctiidae

[more]

Bairdiidae

[more]

Bairdiocyprididae

[more]

Baissodidae

[more]

Baissogryllidae

[more]

Baissopteridae

[more]

Bakevelliidae

Bakevelliidae is an extinct family of prehistoric bivalves that lived from the Late Mississippian until the Middle Eocene. Bakevelliidae species are found worldwide, excluding Antarctica. Living a stationary life attached to substrate in marine and brackish environments, they formed shells of an aragonite composition with a low amount of magnesium calcite. The family was named by King in 1850. At least one genus in the family, , has a notably twisted commissure join. [more]

Balaenanemertidae

[more]

Balaenicipitidae

The Shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) also known as Whalehead or Shoe-billed Stork, is a very large stork-like bird. It derives its name from its massive shoe-shaped bill. The adult bird is 115 to 150 centimeters (45 to 59 in) tall, 100 to 140 centimeters (39 to 55 in) long, 230 to 260 centimeters (91 to 100 in) across the wingspan and weighs 4 to 7 kilograms (8.8 to 15 lb). Their beaks have an average length of 30 centimeters (12 in). The adult is mainly grey while the juveniles are browner. It lives in tropical east Africa in large swamps from Sudan to Zambia. [more]

Balaenidae

Balaenidae () is a family of mysticete whales that contains two living genera. Commonly called the right whales as it contains mainly right whale species. This name can be confusing, however, since one of the species is the Bowhead Whale, which is different from the right whales. [more]

Balaenophilidae

[more]

Balaenopteridae

Rorquals () (family Balaenopteridae) are the largest group of baleen whales, with nine species in two genera. They include the largest animal that has ever lived, the blue whale, which can reach 150 tonnes (170 short tons), and another that reaches 70 tonnes (77 short tons); even the smallest of the group, the northern minke whale, reaches 9 tonnes (9.9 short tons). [more]

Balanidae

Balanidae is a family of barnacles of the order Sessilia, containing the following genera: [more]

Balanobothriidae

[more]

Balanotaeniidae

[more]

Balatonospiridae

[more]

Balenophilidae

[more]

Baleyopterygidae

[more]

Balfouriidae

[more]

Balistidae

Triggerfishes are about 40 species of often brightly colored fishes of the family Balistidae. Often marked by lines and spots, they inhabit tropical and subtropical oceans throughout the world, with the greatest species richness in the Indo-Pacific. Most are found in relatively shallow, coastal habitats, especially at coral reefs, but a few, such as the aptly named oceanic triggerfish (Canthidermis maculata), are pelagic. While several species from this family are popular in the marine aquarium trade, they are often notoriously ill-tempered. [more]

Balitoridae

The hillstream loaches or river loaches are a family, the Balitoridae, of small Eurasian fish (a single species, Afronemacheilus abyssinicus is from Africa). Many of the species are popular for aquaria. They have a number of similarities with the Cobitidae, their sibling family of "loaches", such as multiple barbels around the mouth. They should not be confused with the loricariids, which look similar but are a family of catfish. [more]

Balloniscidae

[more]

Ballophidae

[more]

Ballophilidae

[more]

Bangtoupocrinidae

[more]

Banjosidae

The Banjofish (Banjos banjos) is a perciform fish, the only species in the genus Banjos and in the family Banjosidae. [more]

Banksinomidae

[more]

Baphetidae

[more]

Baptanodontidae

[more]

Baptornithidae

[more]

Barbarochthonidae

[more]

Barbereniidae

[more]

Barbourisiidae

The velvet whalefish, Barbourisia rufa, is a deep-sea whalefish, the sole known member of its family Barbourisiidae. It is found throughout the tropical and temperate parts of the world's oceans, mainly in the Pacific near Japan and New Zealand, at depths of 300 to 2,000 m. This species seems very closely related to some flabby whalefishes and it was initially believed to belong into that family by some. They have been found from 65?N to 40?S in the Atlantic, 50?N to 50?S in the Pacific, and 5?20?S in the Indian Ocean. [more]

Barbutiidae

[more]

Bardohymenidae

[more]

Barentsiidae

[more]

Barleeidae

[more]

Barleeiidae

Barleeiidae (often also spelled as Barleeidae) is a family of minute sea snails, micromollusks in the clade Littorinimorpha. These snails are very abundant and live in sublittoral and intertidal waters on rocky substrates. [more]

Barrandeoceratidae

[more]

Barroisiidae

[more]

Barybrotidae

[more]

Barychelidae

The Brushed trapdoor spiders (family Barychelidae) are a spider family with about 300 species in 44 general. This family is the only family in superfamily Barycheloidea. [more]

Barycrinidae

[more]

Barylambdidae

[more]

Baryonychidae

[more]

Barytheriidae

[more]

Baseodiscidae

[more]

Basiliolidae

[more]

Basilobelbidae

[more]

Basilosauridae

Basilosauridae is family of extinct cetaceans that lived in tropical seas during the late Eocene. [more]

Basipodellidae

[more]

Bastianiidae

[more]

Bataguridae

Geoemydidae (formerly known as Bataguridae) is the largest and most diverse family[] in the order Testudines (turtles) with about 70 species. It includes the Eurasian pond and river turtles and Neotropical wood turtles. [more]

Bateidae

Bateidae is a family of amphipod crustaceans, comprising the single genus Batea, which in turn contains thirteen species: [more]

Bathocyroidae

Bathocyroe is a genus of ctenophores, the only genus in the family Bathocyroidae. [more]

Bathornithidae

[more]

Bathybelidae

[more]

Bathybelosidae

[more]

Bathycheilidae

Bathycheilidae is a family of trilobites comprising the genera Bathycheilus, and Eulomina. [more]

Bathyclupeidae

The deepsea herrings are perciform fishes belonging to a small family (Bathyclupeidae) with a single genus (Bathyclupea) containing seven species of deep water fishes. [more]

Bathycotylidae

[more]

Bathycrinidae

Bathycrinidae is a family of echinoderms in the class Crinoidea. It contains the following genera and species: [more]

Bathyctenidae

[more]

Bathydorididae

[more]

Bathydraconidae

The Antarctic dragonfishes are a family, Bathydraconidae, of deep-sea perciform fishes. [more]

Bathyergidae

[more]

Bathyergoididae

Bathyergoides is an extinct genus of rodent from Africa thought to be related to the modern blesmols. It is the only member of the family Bathyergoididae. [more]

Bathylaconidae

[more]

Bathylagidae

The deep-sea smelts are a family, Bathylagidae, of marine smelts. [more]

Bathylasmatidae

[more]

Bathylasmidae

[more]

Bathylutichthyidae

Bathylutichthys taranetzi is the only species of the fish family Bathylutichthyidae (the Atlantic sculpins). It is a deep sea fish with a length of about 10 cm, and has been found exclusively in the vicinity of the South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean at depths of 1650 metres. [more]

Bathymasteridae

Ronquils (sometimes spelt ronchils) are perciform marine fish of the small family Bathymasteridae. Found only in Arctic and North Pacific waters, the ronquil family contains just seven species in three genera. The larger species are important to commercial fisheries as food fish. Ronquils are most closely related to the eelpouts and prowfish. [more]

Bathynataliidae

[more]

Bathynellidae

[more]

Bathynotidae

[more]

Bathyodontidae

[more]

Bathypalaemonellidae

[more]

Bathyphellidae

[more]

Bathyphelliidae

[more]

Bathyphytophilidae

Bathyphytophilidae is a family of very small deepwater sea snails or false limpets, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Vetigastropoda (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Bathypontiidae

[more]

Bathysauridae

The Bathysauridae are a small family of deep water aulopiform fish, related to the telescopefishes. There are just two species in the family, both belonging to the genus Bathysaurus. Commonly called deepwater lizardfishes or "deepsea lizardfishes", the latter name usually refers to the species B. ferox specifically. [more]

Bathysauroididae

[more]

Bathysciadiidae

Bathysciadiidae is a family of sea snails, deep-sea limpets, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Cocculiniformia (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Bathyspadellidae

[more]

Bathysquillidae

[more]

Bathyteuthidae

Bathyteuthis is the singular genus of squid in the family Bathyteuthidae, encompassing three species. None obtain a mantle length greater than 80 mm. [more]

Bathytropidae

[more]

Bathyuridae

[more]

Batillaridae

[more]

Batillariidae

Batillariidae, common name batillariids or mudcreepers, are a family of marine, cerithioidean gastropod molluscs in the clade Sorbeoconcha. They consist of 14 living species, classified in six to eight genera. [more]

Batillipedidae

[more]

Batkeniidae

[more]

Batocrinidae

[more]

Batoporidae

[more]

Batoteuthidae

Bush-club Squid (Batoteuthis skolops) is the single rare species in genus Batoteuthis, which is the only genus in family Batoteuthidae. The squid is found in Antarctic waters, and reaches a mantle length of at least 350 mm. Some features of this creature are a small head, a long tail and a very peculiar tentacle with six series of suckers on the club. [more]

Batrachedridae

Batrachedridae is a small family of moths. These are small, slender moths which rest with the wings wrapped tightly around the body. The taxonomy of this and related groups is often disputed. It was long thought to contain two genera, Batrachedra (many species) and Houdinia (a single species, Houdinia flexissima from New Zealand and surrounding islands). [more]

Batrachideidae

[more]

Batrachiderpetontidae

[more]

Batrachoididae

Batrachoididae is the only family in the ray-finned fish order Batrachoidiformes. Fish in this family are usually called toadfish: both the English common name and scientific name refer to their toad-like appearance (batrakhos is Greek for frog). [more]

Batrachopodidae

[more]

Batrachosauroididae

[more]

Batrachostomidae

The frogmouths are a group of nocturnal birds related to the nightjars. They are found from the Indian Subcontinent across Southeast Asia to Australia. [more]

Batrachotrematidae

[more]

Bauriidae

Bauriidae is a family of therocephalian therapsids. Bauriids are among the most advanced eutherocephalians and possess several mammal-like features such as a secondary palate. Unlike other therocephalians, bauriids were herbivorous. Two subfamilies are classified within Bauriidae: Nothogomphodontinae and Bauriinae. [more]

Baurusuchidae

[more]

Bavarisauridae

[more]

Bdellidae

[more]

Bdellodrilidae

[more]

Bdellouridae

[more]

Beaniidae

Beaniidae is a small bryozoan family in the cheilostomatan suborder Flustrina. Their zooids have a weak box-like shell of calcium carbonate as most Flustrina, and in this family typically arranged disjunctly, connected by small tubes, and often boat-shaped. One species, , is the only known amphibious bryozoan known as of 2008/09. [more]

Becksiidae

[more]

Bedelliidae

Bedelliidae is a small family of small, narrow-winged moths; most authorities recognize just a single genus, Bedellia, previously included in the family Lyonetiidae. The family is still included in the Lyonetiidae as the subfamily Bedelliinae by some authors. [more]

Bedotiidae

Bedotiidae is a family of fish known as the Madagascar rainbowfish, Madagascan rainbowfish, or Malagasy rainbowfish due to their endemism to Madagascar. It includes two genera, Bedotia and Rheocles. [more]

Beecherellidae

[more]

Beecheriidae

[more]

Beesoniidae

Beesoniidae is a family of scale insects commonly known as Beesoniids. They typically cause galls on their plant hosts. Members of this family mostly come from southern Asia. [more]

Behningiidae

[more]

Belemnitellidae

[more]

Belemnitidae

[more]

Belemnopseidae

[more]

Belemnoseidae

[more]

Belemnotheutididae

[more]

Belidae

Belidae is a family of weevils, called belids or primitive weevils because they have straight antennae, unlike the "true weevils" or Curculionidae which have elbowed antennae. They are sometimes known as "cycad weevils", but this properly refers to a few species from the genera and Rhopalotria. [more]

Bellerophinidae

Bellerophinidae is an extinct family of sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the clade Littorinimorpha. [more]

Bellerophontidae

The Bellerophontidae is an extinct family of specialized globose bellerophontids; Paleozoic and Early Triassic mollusks of uncertain position (Gastropoda or Monoplacophora). [more]

Belliidae

[more]

Belohinidae

Belohina inexpectata is a polyphagan beetle and the sole member of family Belohinidae. It is endemic to southern Madagascar. Only a few specimens of this species are known. [more]

Belondiridae

[more]

Belonenchidae

[more]

Belonidae

Needlefish (family Belonidae) are piscivorous fishes primarily associated with very shallow marine habitats or the surface of the open sea. Some genera include species found in marine, brackish, and freshwater environments (e.g., Strongylura) while a few genera are confined to freshwater rivers and streams, including Belonion, Potamorrhaphis, and Xenentodon. Needlefish closely resemble North American freshwater gars (family Lepisosteidae) in being elongated and having long, narrow jaws filled with sharp teeth, and some species of needlefish are referred to as gars or garfish despite being only distantly related to the true gars. In fact the name "garfish" was originally used for the needlefish Belone belone in Europe and only later applied to the North American fishes by European settlers during the 18th century. [more]

Belonolaimidae

[more]

Belontiidae

Gouramis are a family, Osphronemidae, of freshwater perciform fishes. The fish are native to Asia, from Pakistan and India to the Malay Archipelago and north-easterly towards Korea. The name "gourami" is also used for fish of the families Helostomatidae and Anabantidae. "Gouramis" is an example of a redundant plural. Gourami is already plural, in its original language. [more]

Belopteridae

[more]

Belosaepiidae

Belosaepiidae is a family of cephalopods known from the Eocene, and bearing close similarity to the sepiid cuttlefish, whilst retaining the remnants of a belemnite-like guard. [more]

Belosepiellidae

[more]

Belostomatidae

Belostomatidae is a family of insects in the order Hemiptera, known as giant water bugs or colloquially as toe-biters, electric-light bugs and Alligator Ticks (in Florida). They are the largest insects in the order Hemiptera, and occur worldwide, with most of the species in North America, South America, Northern Australia and East Asia. They are typically encountered in freshwater streams and ponds. Most species are relatively large (2 cm or more) with some of the largest, such as Lethocerus, exceeding 12 cm, and nearly reaching the dimensions (length and mass) of some of the larger beetles in the world. Giant water bugs are a popular food in Thailand. [more]

Bemalambdidae

[more]

Bembidiacaridae

[more]

Bembridae

The Deep-water flatheads are a family, the Bembridae, of bottom-dwelling fish. They are thought to be more primitive than their close relatives, the true flatheads. Despite the common name, their heads are only slightly flattened and have spiny ridges. [more]

Benedeniporidae

[more]

Benthesicymidae

[more]

Bentheuphausiidae

Bentheuphausia amblyops, the deep sea krill is a species of krill, small shrimp-like crustaceans living in the ocean. B. amblyops is the only species within its genus, which in turn is the only genus within the family Bentheuphausiidae. All the 85 other species of krill known are classified in the family Euphausiidae. [more]

Benthimermithidae

[more]

Benthopectinidae

[more]

Benthosuchidae

[more]

Beornidae

[more]

Beraeidae

[more]

Berkhoceratidae

[more]

Bernardichthyidae

[more]

Bernissartiidae

[more]

Beroidae

[more]

Berothidae

The beaded lacewings, Berothidae, are a family of winged insects of the order Neuroptera. The family was first named by Anton Handlirsch in 1906. [more]

Berounellidae

[more]

Bertiliellidae

[more]

Berycidae

The Berycidae is a small family of deep sea fishes, related to the squirrelfishes. The family includes the alfonsinos and the nannygais. [more]

Berytidae

Berytidae is a family of bugs, commonly called stilt bugs. [more]

Berytoniscidae

[more]

Bestjubellidae

[more]

Bethylidae

[more]

Bethylonymidae

[more]

Beyrichiidae

[more]

Beyrichitidae

[more]

Biancolinidae

[more]

Biantidae

[more]

Bibionidae

Bibionidae (march flies and lovebugs) is a family of flies (Diptera). Approximately 650-700 species are known worldwide. [more]

Bicellariellidae

[more]

Biernatidae

[more]

Bifaxariidae

[more]

Billingsellidae

[more]

Bimichaeliidae

[more]

Bimuriidae

[more]

Binneyidae

Binneyidae is a family of air-breathing land slugs, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Arionoidea (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Binneytidae

[more]

Bintoniellidae

[more]

Bipaliidae

[more]

Bipedidae

Bipedidae, are a family of amphisbaenians. They are found only in Mexico. Ajolotes are carnivorous, burrowing reptiles, but unlike other species of amphisbaenian, they possess two stubby forelimbs placed far forward on the body. The shovel-like limbs are used to scrape away soil while burrowing through the soil, in a similar manner to a mole. [more]

Biphyllidae

[more]

Birgeidae

[more]

Birgeriidae

[more]

Birkeniidae

[more]

Birobatidae

[more]

Biroellidae

[more]

Bisatoceratidae

[more]

Bithyniidae

Bithyniidae is a family of small freshwater snails with an operculum, aquatic gastropod molluscs in the clade Littorinimorpha. [more]

Bittacidae

Bittacidae is a family of scorpionflies commonly called Hangingflies or hanging scorpionflies. [more]

Bittnerulidae

[more]

Biturritiidae

[more]

Bivesiculidae

[more]

Biwadrilidae

[more]

Blaberidae

[more]

Blaniulidae

[more]

Blasticotomidae

[more]

Blastobasidae

Blastobasidae is a family of moths in the superfamily Gelechioidea. Its species can be found almost anywhere in the world, though in some places they are not native but introduced by humans. In some arrangements, these moths are included in the case-bearer family (Coleophoridae) as subfamily Blastobasinae. The Symmocidae are sometimes included in the Blastobasidae (particularly if both are included in Coleophoridae) as subfamily or tribe. [more]

Blatellidae

[more]

Blattellidae

The Blattellidae is a family of the order Blattaria (cockroaches). This family contains many of the smaller common household cockroaches, among others. They are sometimes called wood cockroaches. [more]

Blattidae

The Blattidae is a family of the order Blattaria (cockroaches). It contains several of the most common household cockroaches. [more]

Blattinopsidae

[more]

Blenniidae

Combtooth blennies are blennioids; perciform marine fish of the family Blenniidae. They are the largest family of blennies, with approximately 371 species in 53 genera represented. Combtooth blennies are found in tropical and subtropical waters in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans; some species are also found in brackish and even freshwater environments. [more]

Blephariceridae

Blephariceridae, commonly known as Net-winged midges, are a nematoceran family in the order Diptera. The adults resemble crane flies except with a projecting anal angle in the wings, and different head shape, absence of the V on the mesonotum, and more laterally outstretched forward-facing legs. They are uncommon, but there are dozens of genera worldwide, and over 200 species. [more]

Blepharoceridae

Blephariceridae, commonly known as Net-winged midges, are a nematoceran family in the order Diptera. The adults resemble crane flies except with a projecting anal angle in the wings, and different head shape, absence of the V on the mesonotum, and more laterally outstretched forward-facing legs. They are uncommon, but there are dozens of genera worldwide, and over 200 species. [more]

Blikanasauridae

The Blikanasauridae were a group of early sauropodomorph dinosaurs. The clade was first proposed by Galton and van Heerden in 1985. The family consists of Blikanasaurus and its nearest relatives. However, it is not clear which other genera are included in the family. The family is not used in many current taxonomies; Benton (2004) does not list the clade. The Blikanasaurids were once considered Prosauropods, but new research indicates they may in fact have been basal Sauropods. [more]

Bochicidae

Bochicidae is a family of pseudoscorpions distributed throughout the Caribbean, Central America and Mexico with one species found as far north as Texas. Members of the family can be diagnosed mainly by features of the claws, notably the presence of exactly 12 trichobothria on each claw (members of other similar families possess many more) and a long, as opposed to short, venom duct. Some species live in caves while some are surface-dwelling. [more]

Bodotriidae

Bodotriidae is a family of crustaceans belonging to the order Cumacea. [more]

Boettgerillidae

[more]

Boganiidae

Boganiidae is a family of beetles, in the suborder Polyphaga. [more]

Bogatiidae

[more]

Bogidiellidae

[more]

Bohaispiridae

Bohaispiridae is an extinct family of sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the clade Littorinimorpha. [more]

Bohartillidae

[more]

Bohemiellidae

[more]

Bohemillidae

[more]

Boholdoyidae

[more]

Boidae

The Boidae are a family of nonvenomous snakes found in America, Africa, Europe, Asia and some Pacific Islands. Relatively primitive snakes, adults are medium to large in size, with females usually larger than the males. Two subfamilies comprising eight genera and 43 species are currently recognized. [more]

Bojophlebiidae

[more]

Bolaspididae

[more]

Bolbocephalodidae

[more]

Bolboceratidae

[more]

Bolinopsidae

Bolinopsidae is a family of ctenophores, it contains the following species: [more]

Bolitaenidae

Bolitaenidae is a family of small, common pelagic octopuses found in all tropical and temperate oceans of the world. The family's taxonomy is not entirely certain; recent research suggests there should be just two genera, and Japetella, both of which are thought to be monotypic. Under this view, the family would represent two very similar species: Bolitaena pygmaea and Japetella diaphana. [more]

Bolithophilidae

[more]

Bolitophilidae

Bolitophilidae is a family of Diptera comprising only one genus, >, with contains around 40 Palaearctic and about 20 Nearctic species, and 3 species from the Oriental region. [more]

Bolliidae

[more]

Boloceroididae

[more]

Bolodontidae

[more]

Bolosauridae

[more]

Bolyeridae

The Bolyeriidae are a family of snakes native to Mauritius and a few islands around it, especially Round Island. In the past they also occurred on the island of Mauritius, but were extirpated there due to human influence and foraging pigs in particular. These snakes were formerly placed in the Boidae, but are now classed as a separate family. Currently, two monotypic genera are recognized, but only a single species is extant. [more]

Bolyeriidae

The Bolyeriidae are a family of snakes native to Mauritius and a few islands around it, especially Round Island. In the past they also occurred on the island of Mauritius, but were extirpated there due to human influence and foraging pigs in particular. These snakes were formerly placed in the Boidae, but are now classed as a separate family. Currently, two monotypic genera are recognized, but only a single species is extant. [more]

Bombinatoridae

Bombinatoridae are often referred to as Fire-bellied toads because of their brightly colored ventral sides, which show that they are highly toxic to humans. This family includes two genera, Barbourula and Bombina, both of which have flattened bodies. [more]

Bombycidae

Bombycidae is a family of moths. The best-known species is Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) or silkworm, native to northern China and domesticated for millennia. Another well known species is Bombyx mandarina, also native to Asia. [more]

Bombycillidae

The waxwings form the genus Bombycilla of passerine birds. According to most authorities, this is the only genus placed in the family Bombycillidae. [more]

Bombylidae

[more]

Bombyliidae

Bombyliidae is a large family of flies with hundreds of genera, although their life cycles are not well known. Adults generally feed on nectar and pollen, thus are pollinators of flowers. They superficially resemble bees, thus are commonly called bee flies, and this may offer the adults some protection from predators. In parts of East Anglia locals refer to them as 'beewhals', thanks to their tusk-like appendages. [more]

Bomolochidae

Bomolochidae is a family of parasitic copepods, containing the following genera: [more]

Bonaducecytheridae

[more]

Bonapartheriidae

[more]

Bonelliidae

[more]

Boniniidae

[more]

Bonneviellidae

[more]

Boopidae

[more]

Bopyridae

Bopyridae is a family of isopod crustaceans in the suborder Cymothoida. Members of the family are ectoparasites of crabs and shrimps. They live in the gill cavities or on the carapace where they cause a noticeable swelling. Fossil crustaceans have occasionally been observed to have a similar characteristic bulge. [more]

Boreidae

Boreidae, commonly called Snow scorpionflies, are a very small family of Scorpionflies, containing only around 30 species, all of which are boreal or high-altitude species in the Northern Hemisphere. Recent research indicates that the boreids are more closely related to fleas than to other scorpionflies, which renders the order Mecoptera paraphyletic if the order Siphonaptera is excluded from it. [more]

Boreiothyrididae

[more]

Borhidiidae

[more]

Borhyaenidae

[more]

Boridae

The family Boridae is a small group of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name conifer bark beetles. [more]

Borneacrididae

[more]

Bornellidae

Bornellidae is a family of sea snails or sea slugs, marine gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Tritonioidea. [more]

Boselliidae

Bosellia is a genus of sea slugs, marine gastropod mollusks within the superfamily Placobranchoidea. [more]

Bosminidae

[more]

Bostrichidae

The Bostrichidae are a family of beetles with more than 700 described species. They are commonly called auger beetles, false powderpost beetles or horned powderpost beetles. The head of most auger beetles cannot be seen from above, as it is downwardly directed and hidden by the thorax. An exception is the powderpost beetles from the subfamily Lyctinae. [more]

Bostrychidae

The Bostrichidae are a family of beetles with more than 700 described species. They are commonly called auger beetles, false powderpost beetles or horned powderpost beetles. The head of most auger beetles cannot be seen from above, as it is downwardly directed and hidden by the thorax. An exception is the powderpost beetles from the subfamily Lyctinae. [more]

Bothidae

Lefteye flounders are a family, Bothidae, of flounders. They are called "lefteye flounders" because most species lie on the on their right side, with both eyes on the left side. A helpful reminder when trying to recall the family name for this fish is that "Bothidae eyes are on the same side o' dey head." The family is also distinguished by the presence of spines on the snout and near the eyes. [more]

Bothitrematidae

[more]

Bothrideridae

Bothrideridae is a family of beetles, in the suborder Polyphaga. Larvae of some species are ectoparasites of the larvae and pupas of wood-boring beetles. [more]

Bothriocephalidae

[more]

Bothrioplanidae

[more]

Bothriuridae

[more]

Botiidae

Botiinae is the mainly Southeast Asian subfamily of cypriniform ray-finned fishes that contains the genus Botia. Placed in the true loach family Cobitidae in our time, they were formerly often treated as a distinct family Botiidae. [more]

Botrucnidiferidae

[more]

Botryocrinidae

[more]

Botsfordiidae

[more]

Botulidae

[more]

Botulisaccidae

[more]

Bouchardiidae

[more]

Bougainvilliidae

Bougainvilliidae is a family of marine hydroids in the class Hydrozoa. Members of the family are found worldwide. There are sixteen accepted genera and about ninety three species. [more]

Bougisidae

[more]

Bouretidae

[more]

Bourgueticrinidae

[more]

Bourletiellidae

[more]

Bovichthyidae

The thornfishes are a family, Bovichtidae, of fishes in the order Perciformes. The family is spelled Bovichthyidae in J. S. Nelson's Fishes of the World. They are native to coastal waters off Australia, New Zealand, and South America, and to rivers and lakes of southeast Australia and Tasmania. [more]

Bovichtidae

The thornfishes are a family, Bovichtidae, of fishes in the order Perciformes. The family is spelled Bovichthyidae in J. S. Nelson's Fishes of the World. They are native to coastal waters off Australia, New Zealand, and South America, and to rivers and lakes of southeast Australia and Tasmania. [more]

Bovidae

[more]

Brachaeluridae

The Brachaeluridae, or blind sharks, are a small family of sharks in the order Orectolobiformes. There are only two species of blind shark, both of which are native to shallow coastal waters up to 110 metres (360 ft) depth, off the eastern coast of Australia. [more]

Brachinidae

[more]

Brachionichthyidae

Handfish is an anglerfish of the family Brachionichthyidae, a group which comprises five genera and fourteen extant species. These benthic marine fish are unusual in the way they propel themselves by walking on the sea floor rather than swimming. [more]

Brachionidae

[more]

Brachiosauridae

[more]

Brachiospongiidae

[more]

Brachioteuthidae

Brachioteuthidae is a family of squid. It contains two genera and around six species. [more]

Brachodidae

[more]

Brachycentridae

[more]

Brachycephalidae

The saddleback toads are the family Brachycephalidae () in the order Anura. The family consist of just one genus, Brachycephalus, with 11 species. These tiny, often yellow frogs are native to Atlantic Forest in southeastern Brazil. [more]

Brachycera

Brachycera is a suborder of Diptera. It is a major suborder consisting of around 120 families. The most distinguishing characteristic of the suborder is reduced antenna segmentation. A summary of main physiological characteristics follows: [more]

Brachyceridae

[more]

Brachychthoniidae

[more]

Brachycoeliidae

[more]

Brachycycloceratidae

[more]

Brachycytheridae

[more]

Brachylaimidae

[more]

Brachymetopidae

[more]

Brachyopidae

Brachyopidae is an extinct family of Temnospondyl labyrintodonts. They evolved in the early Mesozoic and were mostly aquatic. A fragmentary find from Lesotho, Africa is estimated to have been 7 meter long, the largest amphibian ever known to have lived besides Prionosuchus. [more]

Brachypauropodidae

[more]

Brachypsectridae

Brachypsectridae is a family of beetles commonly known as the Texas beetles. There is only one genus, . The type species, Brachypsectra fulva (LeConte, 1874), occurs in North America. There are three other species which occur in southern India, Singapore and northwestern Australia. Two other extant and fossil species have been described from the Dominican Republic. [more]

Brachypteraciidae

The ground rollers are a small family of non-migratory near-passerine birds restricted to Madagascar. They are related to the kingfishers, bee-eaters and rollers. They most resemble the latter group, and are sometimes considered a sub-family of the true rollers. [more]

Brachypteridae

[more]

Brachystelechidae

[more]

Brachystomellidae

[more]

Brachythyrididae

[more]

Brachytrematidae

Brachytrematidae is an extinct family of sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the clade Sorbeoconcha. [more]

Braconidae

Braconidae is a family of parasitoid wasps and one of the richest families of insects. Between 50,000 and 150,000 species exist worldwide. The species are grouped into about 45 subfamilies and 1,000 genera, some important ones being: , Aphanta, Asobara, Bracon hebetor, Cenocoelius, Chaenusa, Chorebidea, Chorebidella, Chorebus, Cotesia, Dacnusa, Microgaster, Opius, Parapanteles, Phaenocarpa, Psenobolus. [more]

Bradybaenidae

Bradybaenidae is a taxonomic family of medium-sized to small land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Helicoidea. [more]

Bradycnemidae

[more]

Bradynobaenidae

Bradynobaenidae is a family of wasps similar to the Mutillidae. These species are often found in arid regions. [more]

Bradypodidae

The three-toed sloths are tree-living mammals from South and Central America. They are the only members of the genus Bradypus and the family Bradypodidae. There are four living species of three-toed sloths. These are the Brown-throated Sloth, the Maned Sloth, the Pale-throated Sloth, and the Pygmy Three-toed Sloth. [more]

Brahmaeidae

Brahmaeidae is a family of insects in the Lepidoptera order, commonly known as brahmin moths. [more]

Bramidae

Pomfret are perciform fishes belonging to the family Bramidae. [more]

Branchinectidae

Branchinectidae is a family in the order Anostraca (fairy shrimp), containing two genera ? Branchinecta and . The majority of the species are in the genus Branchinecta, with only Archaebranchinecta pollicifera and the fossil Archaebranchinecta barstowensis in the second genus. [more]

Branchiobdellidae

[more]

Branchiosauridae

[more]

Branchiostomatidae

Branchiostomidae (syn: Branchiostomatidae) is the family that includes most of the lancelets, which are tiny chordates without a true spine but only a flexible notochord. [more]

Branchiostomidae

Branchiostomidae (syn: Branchiostomatidae) is the family that includes most of the lancelets, which are tiny chordates without a true spine but only a flexible notochord. [more]

Branchipodidae

Branchipodidae is a family of fairy shrimp. It contains 35 species in five genera: [more]

Brancoceratidae

[more]

Brandoniidae

[more]

Branneriidae

[more]

Bransoniidae

[more]

Brassolidae

[more]

Braulidae

Braulidae, or bee lice, is a flies family (Diptera) that contains eight species in two genera, Braula and Megabraula. These are very unusual flies, wingless and flattened, and barely recognizable as Diptera. [more]

Brauninidae

[more]

Braunotrematidae

[more]

Bregmacerotidae

Codlets are a family, Bregmacerotidae, of cod-like fishes, containing the single genus Bregmaceros. [more]

Brembodontidae

[more]

Brenthidae

[more]

Brentidae

Brentidae is a cosmopolitan family of primarily xylophagous beetles also known as straight-snouted weevils. The concept of this family has been recently expanded with the inclusion of three groups formerly placed in the Curculionidae; the subfamilies , Cyladinae, and Nanophyinae, as well as the Ithycerinae, previously considered a separate family. They are most diverse in the tropics, but occur throughout the temperate regions of the world. They are among the families of weevils that have non-elbowed antennae, and tend to be elongate and flattened, though there are numerous exceptions. [more]

Bresiliidae

[more]

Brevibuccidae

[more]

Brevicipitidae

Brevicipitinae is a family of Neobatrachia subordio. [more]

Brevipalpidae

[more]

Briareidae

Scleraxonia is a suborder of corals, a member of the phylum Cnidaria [more]

Brinkmanniidae

[more]

Brisingasteridae

[more]

Brisingidae

[more]

Brissidae

[more]

Bristolia

[more]

Brithopididae

[more]

Brithopodidae

Brithopus is an extinct genus of dinocephalian therapsid. It was first named in 1838 and was traditionally classified in the Anteosauria, a group of carnivorous dinocephalians. In fact, Brithopus served as the basis for the family Brithopodidae, which once included many anteosaurian species. Because it is based on fragmentary, non-diagnostic material, Brithopus is now regarded as a nomen dubium, and the sole member of Brithopodidae. Brithopus may even be more closely related to herbivorous tapinocephalids than to anteosaurians. [more]

Brittonematidae

[more]

Brodiidae

[more]

Brodiopteridae

[more]

Bronchocyathidae

[more]

Brongniartiellidae

[more]

Brontornithidae

[more]

Brontotheriidae

Brontotheriidae, also called Titanotheriidae, is a family of extinct mammals belonging to the order Perissodactyla, the order that includes horses, rhinoceroses, and tapirs. Superficially they looked rather like rhinos, although they were not true rhinos and are probably most closely related to horses. They lived around 56?34 million years ago, until the very close of the Eocene. [more]

Brotulidae

[more]

Bruchidae

The bean weevils or seed beetles are a subfamily (Bruchinae) of beetles, now placed in the family Chrysomelidae, though they have historically been treated as a separate family. They are granivores, and typically infest various kinds of seeds or beans, living for most of their lives inside a single seed. The family includes about 1,350 species found worldwide. [more]

Brumptidae

[more]

Brumptiidae

[more]

Brychiopontiidae

[more]

Bryozoa

The Bryozoa, also known as Ectoprocta or commonly as moss animals[], are a phylum of aquatic invertebrate animals. Typically about 0.5 millimetres (0.020 in) long, they are filter feeders that sieve food particles out of the water using a retractable lophophore, a "crown" of tentacles lined with cilia. Most marine species live in tropical waters, but a few occur in oceanic trenches, and others are found in polar waters. One class lives only in a variety of freshwater environments, and a few members of a mostly marine class prefer brackish water. Over 4,000 living species are known. One genus is solitary and the rest colonial. [more]

Bubaridae

[more]

Bucanellidae

[more]

Bucaniidae

[more]

Buccinidae

Buccinidae is a very large and diverse taxonomic family of large sea snails, often known as whelks or true whelks. [more]

Buccinulidae

[more]

Bucconidae

The puffbirds and their relatives in the near passerine family Bucconidae are tropical birds breeding from South America up to Mexico. [more]

Bucculatricidae

Bucculatricidae or (Bucculatrigidae) is a family of moths. This small family has representatives in all parts of the world. Some authors place the group as a subfamily of the family Lyonetiidae. [more]

Bucculatrigidae

Bucculatricidae or (Bucculatrigidae) is a family of moths. This small family has representatives in all parts of the world. Some authors place the group as a subfamily of the family Lyonetiidae. [more]

Bucephalidae

Members of the family Bucephalidae are trematode flatworms with no oral sucker, using instead a rhynchus as an adhesive organ at their anterior end. Many are common parasites of freshwater fish. [more]

Bucerotidae

Hornbills (Bucerotidae) are a family of bird found in tropical and subtropical Africa, Asia and Melanesia. They are characterized by a long, down-curved bill which is frequently brightly-colored and sometimes has a casque on the upper mandible. Both the common English and the scientific name of the family refer to the shape of the bill, "buceros" being "cow horn" in Greek. In addition, they possess a two-lobed kidney. Hornbills are the only birds in which the first two neck vertebrae (the axis and atlas) are fused together; this probably provides a more stable platform for carrying the bill. The family is omnivorous, feeding on fruit and small animals. They are monogamous breeders nesting in natural cavities in trees and sometimes cliffs. A number of species of hornbill are threatened with extinction, mostly insular species with small ranges. [more]

Buchiidae

[more]

Buchiolidae

[more]

Buchneriidae

[more]

Bucorvidae

The ground hornbills (Bucorvinae) are a subfamily of the hornbill family Bucerotidae, with a single genus Bucorvus and two extant species. [more]

Buddelundiellidae

Trichoniscidae are a family of isopods (woodlice), including the most abundant British woodlouse, Trichoniscus pusillus. [more]

Buergeriellidae

[more]

Buffonellodidae

[more]

Bufonidae

Bufonidae is the family of the true toads, members of the order Anura (frogs and toads). They are the only family of anurans all members of which are known as "toads." The bufonids now comprise more than 35 genera, Bufo being the most widespread and well known. [more]

Bugulidae

[more]

Bulbogamasidae

[more]

Buliminidae

[more]

Bulimulidae

Bulimulinae is a taxonomic subfamily of medium-sized to large, air-breathing, tropical and sub-tropical land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod molluscs in the family Orthalicidae, according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda (Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005). [more]

Bulinidae

[more]

Bullactidae

Haminoeidae, commonly known as the haminoeid bubble snail family, is a taxonomic family of sea snails, marine opisthobranch gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Haminoeoidea. [more]

Bullidae

Bulla is a genus of medium to large hermaphrodite sea snails, shelled marine opisthobranch gastropod molluscs. These herbivorous snails are in the suborder Cephalaspidea, headshield slugs, and the order Opisthobranchia. [more]

Bullinidae

Bullinidae is a taxonomic family of small sea snails or bubble snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Acteonoidea. [more]

Bunonematidae

[more]

Bunyaviridae

[more]

Buprestidae

Buprestidae is a family of beetles, known as jewel beetles or metallic wood-boring beetles because of their glossy iridescent colors. The family is among the largest of the beetles, with some 15,000 species known in 450 genera. In addition, almost 100 fossil species have been described. [more]

Buproridae

[more]

Burgundiidae

[more]

Burhinidae

The Stone-curlews, also known as Dikkops or Thick-knees are a group of largely tropical birds in the family Burhinidae. Despite the group being classified as waders, most species have a preference for arid or semi-arid habitats. They are found worldwide within the tropical zone, with some species also breeding in temperate Europe and Australia. [more]

Burlingidae

[more]

Burlingiidae

[more]

Burnetidae

[more]

Burramyidae

The pygmy possums are a family of small possums that together form the marsupial family Burramyidae. There are five extant species of pygmy possum, grouped into two genera. Four of the species are endemic to Australia, with one species also co-occurring in Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. [more]

Bursidae

Bursidae, common name "frog snails" or "frog shells" is a rather small taxonomic family of large sea snails, marine gastropod predatory snails in the clade Littorinimorpha. [more]

Buskiidae

[more]

Buthidae

Buthidae is the largest family of scorpions, containing about 80 genera and over 800 species as of mid-2008. Its members are known as, for example, thick-tailed scorpions and bark scorpions. There are a few very large genera (like Ananteris, Centruroides, Compsobuthus or Tityus), but also a high number of species-poor or monotypic ones. New taxa are being described at a rate of several to several dozen new species per year. They occur in the warmer parts of every major landmass on Earth, except on New Zealand. Together with the , the Buthidae make up the superfamily Buthoidea. The family was established by Carl Ludwig Koch in 1837. [more]

Butovicellidae

[more]

Byrrhidae

Byrrhidae, the pill beetles, is a family of beetles in the superfamily Byrrhoidea. [more]

Byrsophlebidae

[more]

Bythitidae

Brotulas are a family, Bythitidae, of ophidiiform fishes, also known as viviparous brotulas as they bear live young. They are found in tropical and subtropical waters throughout the world. They are small fishes, around 5 centimetres (2.0 in) to 10 centimetres (3.9 in) in length, and live in surface waters or around reefs. [more]

Bythocyprididae

[more]

Bythocytheridae

[more]

Bythograeidae

[more]

Byturidae

Byturidae, also known as Fruitworms is a family of beetles, in the suborder Polyphaga. The larvae develop in fruits. Byturus unicolor affects species of Rubus and Geum, the larvae of Raspberry beetle raspberry plants. [more]

Cabiropidae

Cabiropidae is a family of isopod crustaceans in the suborder Cymothoida. The original description was made by Giard and Bonnier in 1887. Members of the family are hyperparasites of other parasitic isopods in the order and some are parasites on other free living isopods. [more]

Cacatuidae

A Family in the Kingdom Animalia.[2] [more]

Cachoplistidae

[more]

Caddidae

[more]

Caecidae

Caecidae is a taxonomic family of very small and minute sea snails or micromolluscs, marine gastropod molluscs in the order Littorinimorpha. [more]

Caeciliaidae

[more]

Caeciliidae

Caeciliidae is the family of common caecilians. They are found in Central and South America, equatorial Africa and India. Like other caecilians, they superficially resemble worms or snakes. [more]

Caeciliusidae

Caeciliusidae is a family of Psocoptera belonging to the suborder Psocomorpha. The family was once named Caeciliidae, but the latter name was changed because of homonymy with a family of amphibians. [more]

Caeculidae

[more]

Caenagnathidae

[more]

Caenidae

Caenidae, or the Small Squaregill Mayflies, is a family of insects consisting of 4 genera comprising 26 individual species. They are found throughout North America in lotic, depostional environments, and they are sprawlers. Caenids occur in quiet and even stagnant water and are often overlooked because they are so small. They like to live in silty bottoms, and their gills are specially adapted for such environments. Adults usually emerge from May to September, but they emerge all year in Florida. Unlike other mayflies, squaregills can be found in degraded conditions and are not reliable markers for undisturbed conditions. [more]

Caenolestidae

The order Paucituberculata () contains the six surviving species of shrew opossum: small, shrew-like marsupials which are confined to the Andes mountains of South America. It is thought that the order diverged from the ancestral marsupial line very early. As recently as 20 million years ago, there were at least seven genera in South America. Today, just three genera remain. They live in inaccessible forest and grassland regions of the High Andes. Insectivores were entirely absent from South America until the Great American Interchange three million years ago, and are currently present only in the northwestern part of the continent. Shrew opossums have lost ground to the these and other placental invaders that fill the same ecological niches. Nevertheless, the ranges of shrew opossums and insectivores overlap broadly. [more]

Caesionidae

The fusilier fishes are a family, Caesionidae, of fishes in the order Perciformes. They are related to the snappers, but adapted for feeding on plankton, rather than on larger prey. [more]

Cainotheriidae

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Calabozoidae

Calabozoidae is a family of isopod crustaceans, placed in its own order, Calabozoida or Calabozoidea. It comprises two genera, and Pongycarcina. [more]

Calamoceratidae

[more]

Calamophylliidae

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Calamyzidae

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Calanidae

Calinidae is the largest taxonomic family of calanoid copepods. It includes the genus Calanus, which may be the most abundant animal genus on Earth. Copepods of the genera Calanus and are ecologically important in the Arctic and subarctic regions of the world's oceans. [more]

Calanticidae

[more]

Calappidae

Calappidae is a family of crabs containing 16 genera, of which 7 are only known as fossils: [more]

Calceocrinidae

[more]

Calceolidae

[more]

Calceostomatidae

[more]

Calcifibrospongiidae

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Caleremaeidae

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Caligidae

The sea louse (plural sea lice) is a copepod within the order Siphonostomatoida, family Caligidae. There are around 559 species in 37 genera, including approximately 162 and 268 Caligus species. Sea lice are marine ectoparasites (external parasites) that feed on the mucus, epidermal tissue, and blood of host marine fish. [more]

Caligonellidae

[more]

Caliphyllidae

Caliphyllidae is a taxonomic family of sacoglossan sea slugs. These are marine opisthobranch gastropod mollusks in the clade Sacoglossa. [more]

Callaeatidae

The small bird family Callaeidae (also named in some sources as Callaeatidae) is endemic to New Zealand. It contains three monotypic genera; of the three species in the family, only two survive and both of them, the Kokako and the Saddleback, are endangered species, threatened primarily by the predations of introduced mammalian species such as rats, mustelids and possums. A third, the Huia became extinct early in the 20th century. [more]

Callaeidae

A Family in the Kingdom Animalia.[3] [more]

Callanthiidae

The splendid perches are a small family, Callanthiidae, of fishes in the order Perciformes. [more]

Callianassidae

Callianassidae is a family of ghost shrimp of the order Decapoda. It is divided into 13 subfamilies and 42 genera: [more]

Callianideidae

[more]

Callichthyidae

Callichthyidae is a family of catfishes (order Siluriformes), called armored catfishes due to the two rows of bony plates (or scutes) running down the length of the body. This family contains some of the most popular freshwater aquarium fish, such as the Corydoras. [more]

Callidulidae

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Calliodentaliidae

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Callionymidae

Dragonets are small, perciform, marine fish of the diverse family Callionymidae (from the Greek kallis, "beautiful" and onyma, "name"). Found mainly in the tropical waters of the western Indo-Pacific, the family contains approximately 186 species in 18 genera. The Draconettidae may be considered a sister family, whose members are very much alike, though rarely seen. Due to similarities in morphology and behaviour, dragonets are sometimes confused with members of the goby family. [more]

Calliopidae

Calliopiidae is a family of amphipods, containing the following genera: [more]

Calliopiidae

Calliopiidae is a family of amphipods, containing the following genera: [more]

Callioplanidae

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Calliostomatidae

Calliostomatidae is a family of sea snails within the superfamily Trochoidea and the clade Vetigastropoda. [more]

Callipallenidae

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Callipharixenidae

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Calliphoridae

Calliphoridae (commonly known as blow-flies, carrion flies, bluebottles, greenbottles, or cluster flies) are insects in the Order Diptera, family Calliphoridae. The family is known to be non-monophyletic, but much remains disputed regarding proper treatment of the constituent units, some of which are occasionally accorded family status (e.g., Bengaliidae, Helicoboscidae, Polleniidae, Rhiniidae). [more]

Callipodidae

[more]

Callirhipidae

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Callistoplacidae

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Callitrichidae

The Callitrichidae (synonym Hapalidae) is one of five families of New World monkeys. The family includes several genera, including the marmosets, tamarins, and lion tamarins. For a few years, this group of animals was regarded as a subfamily, called the Callitrichinae, of the family Cebidae. [more]

Callochitonidae

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Callocystitidae

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Callodictyidae

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Callodistomatidae

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Calloporidae

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Callorhinchidae

The family Callorhincidae (sometimes spelled "Callorhynchidae"), or plough-nose chimaeras, are a family of marine fish. They are similar in form and habits to other chimaeras, but are distinguished by the presence of an elongated and flexible fleshy snout, with a vague resemblance to a ploughshare. The snout is used to probe the sea bottom in search of the invertebrates and small fishes on which it preys. [more]

Callorhynchidae

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Callyspongiidae

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Calmidae

Calmidae is a taxonomic family of sea slugs. These are specifically aeolid nudibranchs. They are marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Fionoidea. [more]

Calmoniidae

[more]

Calocalanidae

Calocalanus is a genus of copepods, the only genus in the family Calocalanidae: [more]

Calocarididae

[more]

Calocidae

[more]

Calodiscidae

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Calohypsibiidae

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Calometridae

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Calomyscidae

Mouse-like hamsters are a group of small rodents found in Syria, Azerbaijan, Iran, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. They are found in rocky outcrops and semi-mountainous area in desert regions. [more]

Caloosiidae

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Calophyidae

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Calopiidae

Calopiidae is a family of sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Rissooidea. [more]

Calopsocidae

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Calopterygidae

Calopterygidae are a family of damselflies in the order Odonata and are commonly known as broad-winged damselflies or demoiselles. These rather large damselflies have wingspans of 5?8 cm and they're often metallic-colored. The family contains some 150 species. As the common name suggests they have broader wings than other damselflies and at rest hold their wings parallel to the body and slightly elevated. [more]

Calpensiidae

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Calthropellidae

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Calverocheridae

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Calvertiellidae

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Calvetiidae

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Calwelliidae

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Calycellidae

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Calycodidae

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Calycopsidae

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Calymenidae

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Calymnidae

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Calyptocephalellidae

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Calyptostomatidae

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Calyptraeidae

Calyptraeidae, common name the slipper snails or slipper limpets, cup-and-saucer snails, and Chinese hat snails are a family of small to medium-sized marine prosobranch gastropods. This family includes the slipper snails (Crepidula species), the Chinese hat snails, (Calyptraea species), and the cup-and-saucer snails (Crucibulum species) among others. [more]

Calyptrellidae

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Camaenidae

Camaenidae is a family of air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the superfamily Helicoidea. [more]

Camallanidae

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Camarasauridae

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Camarotoechiidae

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Cambalidae

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Cambalopsidae

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Cambaridae

Cambaridae is the largest of the three families of freshwater crayfish, with over 400 species. Most of the species in the family are native to North America east of the Great Divide, such as the invasive species Procambarus clarkii and Orconectes rusticus, with fewer species living in East Asia and Japan, such as zarigani (Cambaroides japonicus). [more]

Cambarincolidae

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Cambaytheriidae

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Cambridiidae

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Camelidae

Camelids are members of the biological family Camelidae, the only living family in the suborder Tylopoda. dromedaries, Bactrian camels, llamas, alpacas, vicu?as, and guanacos are in this group. [more]

Camerellidae

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Camerobiidae

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Camerophorinidae

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Camerospongiidae

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Camillidae

Camillidae is a family of flies, or Diptera. There are five genera (four living; one fossil). [more]

Camisiidae

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Campanilidae

Campanilidae are a taxonomic family of sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the clade Sorbeoconcha. [more]

Campanorcidae

Campanorco is an extinct genus of notoungulate mammal from the early Eocene of South America and the only member of the family Campanorcidae (McKenna and Bell, 1997). [more]

Campanulariidae

Campanulariidae is a family of animals in the phylum Cnidaria, or stinging celled animals. Campanulariidae is composed entirely of hydroids, a Greek term meaning "Water Animals" applied to the plant-like polyp colonies of the class Hydrozoa. All species of Campanulariidae are aquatic in habitat, primarily inhabiting coastal regions and tidal pools. [more]

Campanulinidae

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Campbellobatidae

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Campephagidae

The cuckooshrikes and allies in the Campephagidae family are small to medium-sized passerine bird species found in the subtropical and tropical Africa, Asia and Australasia. The roughly 85 species are found in eight (or nine) genera which comprise five distinct groups, the 'true' cuckooshrikes (Campephaga, Coracina, , Pteropodocys and Campochaera) the trillers (Lalage), the minivets (Pericrocotus), the flycatcher-shrikes (Hemipus). The wood-shrikes (Tephrodornis) were often considered to be in this family but are probably closer to the helmetshrikes or bushshrikes. Another genus, Chlamydochaera, which has one species, the Black-breasted Fruithunter was often placed in this family but has now been shown to be a thrush (Turdidae). [more]

Campgdoridae

[more]

Campichoetidae

Campichoetidae is a small family of acalyptrate Diptera with only one genus Campichoeta Macquart, 1835.They are regarded by some authors as Diastatidae. [more]

Campodeidae

Campodeidae is a family of hexapods belonging to the order Diplura. These pale, eyeless hexapods, the largest of which grow to around 12 mm in length, can be recognised by the two long, many-segmented cerci at the end of the abdomen. There are around 200 known species. [more]

Campodesmidae

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Camptosauridae

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Campulidae

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Campululidae

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Campydoridae

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Campylaspidae

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Campylognathoididae

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Campylonotidae

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Canaceidae

Canacidae, incorrectly Canaceidae, or beach flies, surf or surge flies, is a family of Diptera.There are 113 species in 12 genera. [more]

Canacidae

Canacidae, incorrectly Canaceidae, or beach flies, surf or surge flies, is a family of Diptera.There are 113 species in 12 genera. [more]

Canadaspididae

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Cancellariidae

Cancellariidae, common name the nutmeg snails or nutmeg shells, are a family of small to medium-large sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Neogastropoda. Their shells resemble a nutmeg seed. [more]

Cancellothyrididae

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Cancerillidae

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Cancridae

Cancridae is a family of crabs. It comprises six extant genera, and eleven exclusively fossil genera, in two subfamilies: [more]

Cancrincolidae

[more]

Candaciidae

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Candelabridae

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Candidae

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Candonidae

Candonidae is a family of ostracods, containing around 25% of all known species of freshwater ostracods. Around 75% of genera in the family are endemic to a single zoogeographic region. It contains more than 500 species, of which more than 300 are endemic to the Palaearctic ecozone. [more]

Candoniidae

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Canestriniidae

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Canidae

Canidae () is the biological family of carnivorous and omnivorous mammals that includes domestic dogs, wolves, foxes, jackals, coyotes, and many other lesser known extant and extinct dog-like mammals. A member of this family is called a canid (/'ke?n?d/). The Canidae family is divided into two tribes: Canini (related to wolves) and Vulpini (related to foxes). The two species of the basal Caninae are more primitive and do not fit into either tribe. [more]

Canopidae

[more]

Canterburyellidae

? Canterburyellidae is an extinct family of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Sorbeoconcha. [more]

Cantharidae

The soldier beetles, Cantharidae, are relatively soft-bodied, straight-sided beetles, related to the Lampyridae or firefly family, but being unable to produce light. They are cosmopolitan in distribution. One common British species is bright red, reminding people of the red coats of soldiers, hence the common name. A secondary common name is leatherwing, obtained from the texture of the wing covers. [more]

Canthocamptidae

Canthocamptidae is a family of copepods. Most of the 700 species are confined to fresh water, although there are also marine species. It contains the following genera: [more]

Canthyloscelidae

The Canthyloscelidae are a small family of midges closely related to the Scatopsidae. [more]

Canthyloscelididae

The Canthyloscelidae are a small family of midges closely related to the Scatopsidae. [more]

Canuellidae

[more]

Caobangidae

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Capillithyrididae

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Capilloventridae

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Capingentidae

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Capitellidae

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Capitonidae

American barbets, family Capitonidae, are near passerine birds of the order Piciformes which inhabit humid forests in Central and South America. They are closely related to the toucans. [more]

Capitosauridae

Mastodonsauridae is a family of capitosauroid temnospondyls. Fossils belonging to this family have been found in North America, Greenland, Europe, Asia, and Australia. The family Capitosauridae (also known as Cyclotosauridae and Stenotosauridae) is synonymous with Mastodonsauridae. [more]

Capniidae

Capniidae, the small winter stoneflies, is a family of insects in the stonefly order (Plecoptera). It constitutes one of the largest stonefly families, containing some 300 species distributed throughout the Holarctic. Their closest relatives are the (Leuctridae). [more]

Caponiidae

Spiders of the ecribellate haplogyne family Caponiidae are unusual in that most species have only two eyes, which is unheard of in other spiders. Other species have four, six or eight eyes. Even in a single species, sometimes the number of eyes changes from spiderling to adult. [more]

Caprellidae

Caprellidae is a of amphipods. [more]

Caprellidea

Caprellinoididae

Caprellidae is a family of amphipods commonly known as skeleton shrimps. Their common name denotes the threadlike slender body which allows them to virtually disappear among the fine filaments of seaweed, hydroids and bryozoans. They are sometimes also known as ghost shrimps. Caprellidae contains 88 genera in three subfamilies. [more]

Caprimulgidae

Nightjars are medium-sized nocturnal or crepuscular birds with long wings, short legs and very short bills. They are sometimes referred to as goatsuckers from the mistaken belief that they suck milk from goats (the Latin for goatsucker is Caprimulgus). Some New World species are named as nighthawks. Nightjars usually nest on the ground. [more]

Caprinidae

[more]

Caprogammaridae

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Caproidae

Boarfishes are a small family, Caproidae, of marine fishes comprising two genera and twelve species. They are usually placed in the order Zeiformes with the dories, but this placement is uncertain, since boarfishes have many perciform characters, for instance in the caudal skeleton. Boarfishes are native to the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans, where mainly found at depths below 50 metres (160 ft). [more]

Capromyidae

[more]

Caprotinidae

[more]

Capsalidae

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Captorhinidae

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Capulidae

Capulidae, common name the cap snails or cap shells, are a taxonomic family of limpet-like sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the clade Littorinimorpha. [more]

Carabidae

Ground beetles are a large, cosmopolitan family of beetles, Carabidae, with more than 40,000 species worldwide, approximately 2,000 of which are found in North America and 2,700 in Europe. [more]

Caraboacaridae

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Carabocepheidae

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Carabocrinidae

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Caraboctonidae

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Carabodidae

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Carabonematidae

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Caracanthidae

The coral crouchers, or orbicular velvetfishes, are a family, the Caracanthidae, of Scorpaeniform fishes. They live in coral reefs of the tropical Indo-Pacific. Only four species are known. [more]

Carangidae

Carangidae is a family of fish which includes the jacks, pompanos, jack mackerels, and scads. [more]

Carangoliopsidae

[more]

Carapidae

Pearlfish is a general name for a variety of marine fish species in the Carapidae family. Pearlfish have been found in tropical waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans at depths up to 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) along oceanic shelves and slopes. [more]

Carayonemidae

Carayonemidae is a family of scale insects commonly known as carayonemids. They typically live among mosses and leaf litter which is unusual for scale insects. Members of this family come from Neotropical areas of South and Central America. [more]

Carbactinoceratidae

[more]

Carbonopteridae

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Carcassonnellidae

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Carcharhinidae

Requiem sharks are a family, Carcharhinidae, of sharks in the order Carcharhiniformes, containing migratory, live-bearing sharks of warm seas (sometimes of brackish or fresh water) such as the tiger shark, the blue shark, the bull shark, and the milk shark. [more]

Carcharodontosauridae

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Carcharodopharyngidae

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Carcharolaimidae

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Carcinonemertidae

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Carcinophoridae

Anisolabididae is a family of earwigs, in the suborder Forficulina and the order Dermaptera. It is one of nine families in the suborder Forficulina, and contains thirty-eight genera spread across thirteen subfamilies. [more]

Cardiidae

Cockle is the common name for a group of (mostly) small, edible, saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the family Cardiidae. [more]

Cardiliidae

[more]

Cardinalidae

The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds found in North and South America. The South American cardinals in the genus Paroaria are placed in another family, the Thraupidae (previously placed in Emberizidae). [more]

Cardiniidae

[more]

Cardioceratidae

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Cardipeltidae

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Carditidae

Carditidae is a family of marine bivalve clams of the order . [more]

Carettochelyidae

The pig-nosed turtle (Carettochelys insculpta), also known as the pitted-shelled turtle or fly river turtle, is a species of turtle native to freshwater streams, lagoons and rivers of Australia and New Guinea.