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Actinopterygii

(Class)

Overview

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Photos

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Taxonomy

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The Class Actinopterygii is a member of the Phylum Chordata. Here is the complete "parentage" of Actinopterygii:

The Class Actinopterygii is further organized into finer groupings including:

Families

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Acanthoclinidae

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Anoplogastridae

Fangtooths are beryciform fish of the family Anoplogastridae (sometimes spelled "Anoplogasteridae") that live in the deep sea. The name is from Greek anoplo meaning "unarmed" and gaster meaning "stomach". With a circumglobal distribution in tropical and cold-temperate waters, the family contains only two very similar species, in one genus, with no known close relatives: the common fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta, found worldwide; and the shorthorned fangtooth, Anoplogaster brachycera, found in the tropical waters of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. [more]

Aracanidae

The Aracanidae are a family of bony fishes related to the boxfishes. They are somewhat more primitive than the true boxfishes, but have a similar protective covering of thickened scale plates. They are found in the Indian Ocean and the west Pacific. Unlike the true boxfishes, they inhabit deep waters, of over 200 metres (660 ft) in depth. [more]

Arapaimidae

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Ariommidae

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Arriidae

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Astronesthidae

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Atherinopsidae

The neotropical silversides are a family Atherinopsidae of fish in the order Atheriniformes. The approximately 104 species in 13 genera are distributed throughout the tropical and temperate waters of the New World, including both marine and freshwater habitats. The familiar grunions and Atlantic silverside belong to this family. [more]

Atherionidae

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Aulopodidae

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Badidae

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Bathylaconidae

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Bathysauridae

The Bathysauridae are a small family of deep water aulopiform fish, related to the telescopefishes. There are just two species in the family, both belonging to the genus Bathysaurus. Commonly called deepwater lizardfishes or "deepsea lizardfishes", the latter name usually refers to the species B. ferox specifically. [more]

Belontiidae

Gouramis are a family, Osphronemidae, of freshwater perciform fishes. The fish are native to Asia, from Pakistan and India to the Malay Archipelago and north-easterly towards Korea. The name "gourami" is also used for fish of the families Helostomatidae and Anabantidae. "Gouramis" is an example of a redundant plural. Gourami is already plural, in its original language. [more]

Bovichthyidae

The thornfishes are a family, Bovichtidae, of fishes in the order Perciformes. The family is spelled Bovichthyidae in J. S. Nelson's Fishes of the World. They are native to coastal waters off Australia, New Zealand, and South America, and to rivers and lakes of southeast Australia and Tasmania. [more]

Brotulidae

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Chandidae

The Asiatic glassfishes are a family, Ambassidae, of freshwater and marine fishes in the order Perciformes. The species in the family are native to the waters of Asia and Oceania and the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. The family includes eight genera and about fifty species. [more]

Chauliodontidae

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Cheimarrhichthyidae

The torrentfish, Cheimarrichthys fosteri, is the only member of the genus Cheimarrichthys which in turn is the only member of the family Cheimarrichthyidae. It is found only in New Zealand. It grows to a maximum length of 18 cm, and commonly found upto 15 cm. [more]

Cobitididae

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Crenuchidae

Crenuchidae, the South American darters, is a family of fresh water fish of the order Characiformes. There are twelve genera including about 74 species, though there are several undescribed species. These fish are relatively small (usually under 10 centimetres or 4 in SL) and originate from eastern Panama and South America Both subfamilies were previously included in the family Characidae, and were placed in a separate family by Buckup, 1998 . Buckup, 1993, revised all genera, except Characidium. [more]

Cyttidae

Cyttidae is a family of large, showy, deep-bodied zeiform marine fish. Found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean, the family contains just three species in the single genus Cyttus. [more]

Datnioididae

Datnioides, also known as tigerfishes, are the only genus of fish in the family Datnioididae. The species of this genus are found in fresh and brackish waters of coastal areas and river estuaries in South and South East Asia. [more]

Dicellopygidae

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Drepaneidae

The sicklefishes are perciform fishes of the genus Drepane, the only genus in the family Drepaneidae. They are found in the Indian and western Pacific Oceans, and in the eastern Atlantic near Africa. (The name "Drepanidae" has been used in the past, but a family of hook-tip moths has priority.) [more]

Echeneididae

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Eleginopidae

Eleginops maclovinus, commonly known as the Patagonian blenny, Falkland's mullet or rock cod, is a species of icefish found in coastal and estuarine habitats around southernmost South America, ranging as far north as Valpara?so on the Pacific side, and Uruguay on the Atlantic side. It is also found around the Falkland Islands, where it has been featured on a stamp. It is the only member of its genus, which is the only member of the family Eleginopidae. Its English names refer to the vaguely blenny-, mullet- or cod-like appearance, but it is not related to true blennies, mullets or cods. Locally, it is often called R?balo, a name also used for the common snook. [more]

Eleotrididae

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Ellimmichthyidae

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Engraulididae

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Ephippididae

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Eschmeyeridae

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Girellidae

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Gonorhynchidae

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Hemirhamphidae

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Howellidae

The oceanic basslets (Howellidae) are a small family of perciform fishes containing three genera and eight species of mostly deep-water, bottom-dwelling fishes: [more]

Idiacanthidae

Idiacanthidae, the black dragonfish, are a family of long, eel-shaped deep sea fish. They are found at depths of 100 to 1000 meters. They have long anal and dorsal fins, but the adults lack pectoral fins. [more]

Labracoglossidae

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Lamprididae

Opah (also commonly known as moonfish, sunfish, kingfish, redfin ocean pan, and Jerusalem haddock) are large, colorful, deep-bodied pelagic Lampriform fish comprising the small family Lampridae (also spelled Lamprididae). There are only two living species in a single genus: Lampris (from the Greek lamprid-, "brilliant" or "clear"). One species is found in tropical to temperate waters of most oceans, while the other is limited to a circumglobal distribution in the Southern Ocean, with the 34th parallel as its northern limit. Two additional species, one in the genus Lampris and the other in the monotypic Megalampris, are only known from fossil remains. The extinct family, Turkmenidae, from the Paleogene of Central Asia, is closely related, though much smaller. [more]

Lateolabracidae

Lateolabrax is a genus of fishes, related to monotypic family Lateolabracidae. The representatives of the genus inbabit the worm coastal waters of the Western Pacific. The genus consists of two species: [more]

Latidae

The Latidae are a family of perch-like fishes found in Africa and the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The family, previously classified subfamily Latinae in family Centropomidae, was raised to family status in 2004 after a cladistic analysis showed the original Centropomidae was paraphyletic. [more]

Liparidae

Snailfish are scorpaeniform marine fish of the family Liparidae. Widely distributed from the Arctic to Antarctic Oceans including the northern Pacific, the snailfish family contains 30 genera and 361 species. They are closely related to the sculpins of the family Cottidae and the lumpfish of the family Cyclopteridae. Snailfish are sometimes included within the latter family. [more]

Lutianidae

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Macroramphosidae

Centriscidae is the family of snipefishes, shrimpfishes, and bellowfishes. A small family, consisting of only about a dozen marine species, they are of an unusual appearance, as reflected by the common names. The members of the genera Aeoliscus and Centriscus are restricted to relatively shallow, tropical parts of the Indo-Pacific, while the remaining species mainly are found in deeper parts of tropical, subtropical or southern oceans. [more]

Macrorhamphosidae

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Melanostomiidae

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Merluccidae

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Monocentrididae

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Nematogenyidae

Nematogenys inermis is a kind of catfish, and the only extant species in the family Nematogenyiidae. This fish originates from fresh water in central Chile. [more]

Opisthognathidae

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Palaeolabridae

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Paralichthodidae

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Peipiaosteidae

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Pempherididae

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Perciliidae

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Poecilopsettidae

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Polycentridae

Leaffishes are small freshwater fishes of the Polycentridae family, from South America. [more]

Pomadasyidae

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Pristigasteridae

Pristigasteridae is a family of fish related to the herrings, and including the genera Ilisha and Pellona. The taxonomic classification of this family is in doubt. One common name for the taxon is longfin herring. [more]

Prochilodontidae

The Prochilodontidae, or flannel-mouthed characins, are a small family of fishes found primarily in the northern half of South America, south to Paraguay and northern Argentina. This family is closely related to the Curimatidae, and in the past they were included in Characidae. [more]

Pseudaphritidae

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Ptereleotridae

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Rhabodlepidae

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Rhombosoleidae

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Scopelosauridae

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Scorpaeinidae

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Synanceidae

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Teraponidae

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Thryptodontidae

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Trigonodontidae

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Zenionidae

The Zenionidae are a family of large, showy, deep-bodied zeiform marine fish. Found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean, the family contains just seven species in three genera. [more]

Zeniontidae

The Zenionidae are a family of large, showy, deep-bodied zeiform marine fish. Found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean, the family contains just seven species in three genera. [more]

More info about the Family Zeniontidae may be found here.

Sources

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Last Revised: August 25, 2014
2014/08/25 13:05:17