font settings and languages

Font Size: Large | Normal | Small
Font Face: Verdana | Geneva | Georgia
Languages:

Amblyscirtes linda

(Linda's Roadside-Skipper)

Overview

[ Back to top ]

Threatened

Threat status

Common Names

[ Back to top ]

Common Names in English:

Linda's Roadside-Skipper

Description

[ Back to top ]

Family Hesperiidae

'The Hesperiidae are members of the Superfamily Hesperioidea. Worldwide in distribution, skippers are richest in the tropics. More than 3,500 species are described, with approximately 275 in North America, many of which are found only in Arizona and Texas. Most skippers are small to medium, usually orange, brown, black, white, or gray. A few have iridescent colors. Skippers have large eyes, short antennae (often with hooked clubs), stout bodies, and three pairs of walking legs . Their flight is often rapid, making wing movement appear blurred. Adults of most species have long probicscises and feed on floral nectar, but some also take up nutrients from bird droppings. Males have scent scales found in modified forewing patches. Males of most species locate mates by perching (grass and giant-skippers), though some patrol, especially in the open-winged skippers. Globular eggs are laid singly.

'[1]

Subfamily Hesperiinae

The grass skippers are members of the Family Hesperiidae. Distributed worldwide, they comprise more than 2,000 species, most of which are found in the American tropics. The small to medium-sized adults usually have abruptly angled antennae with an apiculus at the tip . Adults of many temperate species are predominantly orange, while brown is the most common color of the tropical species. Male forewings usually have a brand or stigma with specialized scales . Most species have long proboscises and are avid flower-visitors. Adults flight is rapid, and perching posture is unique: the hindwings are opened at a wider angle than the forewings. Males of most species perch while looking for mates. Caterpillars feed on monocotyledons (grasses and allied plants ) and live in silken leaf nests that sometimes extend underground. Grass skippers typically overwinter as caterpillars within their shelters .[2]

Physical Description

Species Amblyscirtes linda

Upperside is dark brown with a few light spots; male forewing stigma is obscure . Underside of forewing is deep brown with a black tip ; hindwing is black-brown with gray overscales and a band of pale gray spots. (ref. 105115)

Color:

Upperside is dark brown with a few light spots; male forewing stigma is obscure . Underside of forewing is deep brown with a black tip ; hindwing is black-brown with gray overscales and a band of pale gray spots.

Size/Age/Growth

Wing span : 1 1/8 - 1 5/16 inches (2.9 - 3.4 cm).

Habitat

Near woodland streams .

Biology

[ Back to top ]

Diet

Caterpillar hosts: Indian woodoats grass (Chasmanthium latifolia). Adult food: Nectar from flowers including blackberry.

Reproduction

Females lay eggs singly on the underside of host leaves near the edge . Caterpillars eat leaves, and live and pupate in tents of folded, sealed leaves.

Behavior

Flight: Two broods from April-July.

Taxonomy

[ Back to top ]

Similar Species

[ Back to top ]

Members of the genus Amblyscirtes

ZipcodeZoo has pages for 22 species and subspecies in this genus:

A. aenus (Bronze Roadside-Skipper) · A. aesculapius (Lace-Winged Roadside-Skipper) · A. alternata (Dusky Roadside-Skipper) · A. belli (Bell's Roadside-Skipper) · A. carolina (Carolina Roadside) · A. cassus (Cassus Roadside-Skipper) · A. celia (Celia's Roadside) · A. elissa (Elissa Roadside) · A. eos (Dotted Roadside-Skipper) · A. exoteria (Large Roadside) · A. fimbriata (Orange-Edged Roadside-Skipper) · A. hegon (Pepper and Salt Skipper) · A. linda (Linda's Roadside-Skipper) · A. nereus (Slaty Roadside-Skipper) · A. nysa (Nysa Roadside-Skipper) · A. oslari (Oslar's Roadside-Skipper) · A. phylace (Orange-Headed Roadside-Skipper) · A. reversa (Reversed Roadside) · A. simius (Simius Roadside-Skipper) · A. texanae (Texas Roadside-Skipper) · A. tolteca (Prenda Roadside-Skipper) · A. vialis (Common Roadside-Skipper)

More Info

[ Back to top ]

Further Reading

[ Back to top ]

Notes

[ Back to top ]

Contributors

Identifiers

Footnotes

  1. http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/taxonomy?f=19&sci=Hesperiidae&com=Skippers [back]
  2. http://bugguide.net/index.php?q=search&keys=Stinga&search=Search [back]
Last Revised: 2014-05-07